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I want to insert some element(s) into a vector at the run time. Here I go.

The intention is to print "Hello Hi I am Rasmi"

int main()
{
vector<string>vect;
vect.push_back("Hello");
vect.push_back("Hi");
vect.push_back("Rasmi");
for(vect<string>::iterator it = vect.begin(); it != vect.end(); ++it)
{
 if(*it == "Rasmi") // If it encounters "Rasmi"
    { it--;
         vect.insert(vect.begin()+2, "I am");
    }
   cout << *it;
}
}

But it throwing run time error.

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1  
If you are only looking for one instance of the string in the array then it's often easier to use it=std::find(vect.begin(), vect.end(), "Rasmi") –  the_mandrill Sep 13 '12 at 7:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although I really don't know why you'd need to do such a thing, there is a safe workaround. You can store the current index of the iterator, insert the new element into the vector, then reassign the iterator to reference the potential new memory address. I've included the code to do so here.

if(*it == "Rasmi") // If it encounters "Rasmi"
{
    it--;
    int index = it - vect.begin (); // store index of where we are
    vect.insert(vect.begin()+2, "I am");
    it = vect.begin () + index; // vect.begin () now refers to "new" begin
    // we set it to be equal to where we would want it to be
}
cout << *it;
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vect.insert(vect.begin()+2, "I am");
 }
cout << *it;

iterators are invalidated after you mutate the owning container - i.e. you can't use it after you insert or push_back...

After you add elements, the vector might need to be resized and reallocated automatically, and if that happens, the iterators are no longer valid.

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1  
I upvoted your answer, but the last sentence sounds like it is the responsibility of the developer to resize the vector properly. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 13 '12 at 7:49
    
The iterators positioned before the insertion point are only invalidated if the vector is resized or allocated. Maybe that's what you meant, but it sounds like you are saying that every call to insert or push_back invalidates every iterator. –  Benjamin Lindley Sep 13 '12 at 7:51
    
@ZdeslavVojkovic that's true, poor wording on my part. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 13 '12 at 7:51
2  
@BenjaminLindley well, technically you should treat each mutable operation as invalidating. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 13 '12 at 7:52
    
Not if you reserve. –  Benjamin Lindley Sep 13 '12 at 7:53
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As soon as one of overloads of std::vector::insert() has signature iterator insert ( iterator position, const T& x ) you can rewrite your code as following

for(vect<string>::iterator it = vect.begin(); it != vect.end();)
{

    if(*it == "Rasmi") // If it encounters "Rasmi"
    { 
        it = vect.insert(it, "I am");          
        cout << *it; 
        ++it;
    }
    cout << *it;

    ++it;
}
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