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This is my code:

Stopwatch timer = new Stopwatch();
timer.Start();
while (timer.ElapsedMilliseconds < 3000) {
    label1.Text = Convert.ToString( timer.ElapsedMilliseconds );
}
timer.Stop();

My intetion was to update the label's text in real time, so if timer.ElapsedMilliseconds == 1350, then label1.Text = 1350. How can I do this? Thanks in advance!

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What is your problem? (Please note that this will yield high CPU usage) –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 13 '12 at 9:10
    
If the stopwatch is counting in milliseconds this would mean 1,000 updates a second. Even using a timer, this would be a lot of times to update a user interface. –  Adrian Thompson Phillips Sep 13 '12 at 9:11
    
I have put that code in mainWindow(){}. But the form starts after the timer is at 3000 milliseconds, so the form start after the timer stops. –  user1678541 Sep 13 '12 at 9:12
3  
@Victor Barbu- You can't really update the GUI from the window constructor, since the window wont be visible untill the constructor is complete. –  Øyvind Bråthen Sep 13 '12 at 9:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot update the UI in a tight loop like that, because while the UI thread is running that code, it isn't responding to paint events. You can do nasty things like "DoEvents()", but please don't... it would be better to just have a Timer and update the UI periodically when the timer event fires; every 50ms would be the absolute fastest I'd go, personally.

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You better to use System.Windows.Forms.Timer for this, and not Stopwatch()

Even if that timer is less accurate then StopWatch(..) it gives you a good control.

Just example sniplet:

   myTimer.Tick += new EventHandler(TimerEventProcessor);       
   myTimer.Interval = 1350;
   myTimer.Start();

   private void TimerEventProcessor(...){          
     label1.Text = "...";
   }
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1  
although, I guess he would need to check InvokeRequired before doing the label1.Text = .., right..? –  Default Sep 13 '12 at 9:19
    
@Default: no, in case of Windows.Forms.Timer you do not need that, it runs on UI thread. System.Timer.Timer runs on other thread, so there yes, you need to manage Invoke stuff. –  Tigran Sep 13 '12 at 9:21

Is this a WinForms app?

The problem is that while your loop runs, it does not give any other tasks (like updating the GUI) any possibility to get done, so the GUI will update the the entire loop is complete.

You can add a quick and "dirty" solution here (if WinForms). Modify your loop like this:

while (timer.ElapsedMilliseconds < 3000) {
  label1.Text = Convert.ToString( timer.ElapsedMilliseconds );
  Application.DoEvents();
}

Now the label should update in between the loop runs.

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your method works! thank you! –  user1678541 Sep 13 '12 at 9:14
    
Yes it works, but I hope this is just for testing purposes. I wouldn't rely on a tight loop and Application.DoEvents() in any real application. It's kind of a hack ;) –  Øyvind Bråthen Sep 13 '12 at 9:15
    
Of course it is just for learning purpose. I found all about System.Windows.Forms.Timer –  user1678541 Sep 13 '12 at 11:03

If you want it update every second you could use the modulus operator in your while loop:

Stopwatch timer = new Stopwatch();

timer.Start();

while (timer.ElapsedMilliseconds < 3000) {
    if (timer.ElapsedMilliseconds % 1000 == 0)
    {
        label1.Text = timer.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString();
    }
}

timer.Stop();

The modulus operator gives the remainder of a division operation, if the milliseconds are a multiple of 1,000 it will return 0.

I'd probably look into using Timers. You do a lot of spinning using the above technique, that may cause your UI to be unresponsive.

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