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I'm developing with the 3.5 .NET Framework and I need to use a cache in a multithread senario with lazy-loading pattern for its items. After reading several articles on the web I've tried to write my own implementation. Here's my code.

public class CacheItem
{
    public void ExpensiveLoad()
    {
        // some expensive code
    }
}
public class Cache
{
    static object SynchObj = new object();
    static Dictionary<string, CacheItem> Cache = new Dictionary<string, CacheItem>();
    static volatile List<string> CacheKeys = new List<string>();

    public CacheItem Get(string key)
    {
        List<string> keys = CacheKeys;
        if (!keys.Contains(key))
        {
            lock (SynchObj)
            {
                keys = CacheKeys;
                if (!keys.Contains(key))
                {
                    CacheItem item = new CacheItem();
                    item.ExpensiveLoad();
                    Cache.Add(key, item);
                    List<string> newKeys = new List<string>(CacheKeys);
                    newKeys.Add(key);
                    CacheKeys = newKeys;
                }
            }
        }
        return Cache[key];
    }
}

As you can see the Cache object uses both a dictionary wich stores the real key-value pairs and a list wich duplicates only the keys. When a thread calls the Get method it reads the static shared key list (wich is declared volatile) and call the Contains method to see if the key is already present and if not uses a double-checked lock pattern before starting the lazy loading. At the end of the loading a new instance of the key list is created and stored in the static variable.

Obviously I'm in a situation where the cost of recreating the entire list of keys is almost irrelevant against the cost of a single item loading.

I hope someone can tell me if it is really thread-safe. When I say "thread-safe" I mean that every reader thread can avoid corrupted or dirty reads and every writer thread loads the missing item only once.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Did you look at ReaderWriterLock ? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Kip9000 Sep 13 '12 at 9:52
1  
@Kip9000: That class has been practically deprecated in favor of ReaderWriterLockSlim. – Jon Sep 13 '12 at 9:53
    
@Jon My mistake, I meant to write ReaderWriterLockSlim. ReaderWriterLock doesn't seem deprecated but preferred and much better according to MSDN. – Kip9000 Sep 13 '12 at 9:59
1  
You trade two O(n) lookups for a lock. That can only pay off for trivial lists, no more than a handful of cached items. At least use a HashSet. And time it. – Hans Passant Sep 13 '12 at 10:54
1  
Why not use Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.ContainsKey instead of tracking the keys separately? – Peter Ritchie Sep 13 '12 at 15:36

This is not thread safe since you aren't locking when reading the Dictionary.

There is a race condition whereby one thread can be reading:

return Cache[key];

while another is writing:

_Cache.Add(key, item);

As the MSDN documentation for Dictionary<TKey,TValue> states: `

To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization.

and your synchorization does not include the reader.

You really need to use a thread-safe dictionary, which will simplify your code enormously (you won't need the List at all)

I'd recommend getting the source for the .NET 4 ConcurrentDictionary.

Getting thread safety right is hard, as is evidenced by the fact that some of the other answerers are incorrectly stating that your implementation is thread-safe. Hence I'd trust Microsoft's implementation before a home made one.

If you don't want to use a thread-safe dictionary, then I'd recommend something simple like:

public CacheItem Get(string key)
{
    lock (SynchObj)
    {
        CacheItem item;
        if (!Cache.TryGetValue(key, out item))
        {
            item = new CacheItem();
            item.ExpensiveLoad();
            Cache.Add(key, item);
        }
        return item;
    }
}

You could also try an implementation with a ReaderWriterLockSlim, though you might not get a significant performance improvement (google for ReaderWriterLockSlim performance).

As for an implementation using a ConcurrentDictionary, in most cases I would simply use something like:

static ConcurrentDictionary<string, CacheItem> Cache = 
    new ConcurrentDictionary<string, CacheItem>(StringComparer.Ordinal);
...
CacheItem item = Cache.GetOrAdd(key, key => ExpensiveLoad(key));

This can result in ExpensiveLoad being called more that once for each key, but I bet if you profile your app you'll find that this is so rare as to not be a problem.

If you really insist on ensuring it's only called once, then you could get hold of the .NET 4 Lazy<T> implementation and do something like:

static ConcurrentDictionary<string, Lazy<CacheItem>> Cache = 
    new ConcurrentDictionary<string, Lazy<CacheItem>>(StringComparer.Ordinal);
...

CacheItem item = Cache.GetOrAdd(key, 
               new Lazy<CacheItem>(()=> ExpensiveLoad(key))
             ).Value;

In this version, multiple Lazy<CacheItem> instances might be created, but only one will actually be stored in the dictionary. ExpensiveLoad will be called the first time Lazy<CacheItem>.Value is dereferenced for the instance stored in the dictionary. This Lazy<T> constructor uses LazyThreadSafetyMode.ExecutionAndPublication which uses a lock internally so ensure only one thread calls the factory method ExpensiveLoad.

As an aside, when constructing any dictionary with a string key, I always use the IEqualityComparer<string> parameter (usually StringComparer.Ordinal or StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase) to explicitly document the intention regarding case-sensitivity.

share|improve this answer
    
My first version of the code did not end with the return Cache[key]; statement so maybe was really thread-safe, but was buggy because it always returned null in case of cache hit. So I edited and modified adding the thread-safety issue. – user1667010 Sep 13 '12 at 14:59
    
replacing Dictionary with ConcurrentDictionary wouldn't make it thread-safe. ContainsKey would be thread-safe; but there's still the distinct possibility that CacheKeys changes between the assignment to keys and the call to ContainsKeys. – Peter Ritchie Sep 13 '12 at 15:20
    
@PeterRitchie, I didn't say that replacing Dictionary with ConcurrentDictionary would make this implementation thread-safe. I said ConcurrentDictionary would enable him to simplify his code enormously and get rid of the list. I'll leave the full implementation as an exercise, or for another answerer to provide. – Joe Sep 13 '12 at 15:28
    
@Joe well, the question was about whether the code is thread-safe; so, I assumed that any answer would be addressing that. You don't detail how ConcurrentDictionary is different from Dictionary in such a way as to distinctly result in not needing a List<T>. For example, Dictionary<T1, T2> has ContainsKey method so you can check Dictionary for keys without using a List<T>. So, it's not clear how ConcurrentDictionary would distinctly be different than that. – Peter Ritchie Sep 13 '12 at 15:37
1  
@PeterRitchie, it's not thread safe as I said because one thread is reading the dictionary while another is updating it. The writer thread will be messing with the dictionary's internal structure (buckets and so on) which will cause the reader thread to go "boom" every now and again. I've added a sample using the ConcurrentDictionary to make things more clear. As the MSDN documentation for Dictionary<TKey,TValue> states: "To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization." – Joe Sep 13 '12 at 17:46

So far i can't see any big issues. The only thing i can't see in your code is how do you make the CacheKeys public? The simplest one would be as IList<string> which is filled by a ReadOnlyCollection. This way your consumers can use index operators or the count property quite easily. In this case the volatile keyword should also not be needed cause you already put everything into your lock. So i would pimp your class as follows:

public class CacheItem
{
    public void ExpensiveLoad()
    {
        // some expensive code
    }
}
public class Cache
{
    private static object _SynchObj = new object();
    private static Dictionary<string, CacheItem> _Cache = new Dictionary<string, CacheItem>();
    private static ReadOnlyCollection<string> _CacheKeysReadOnly = new ReadOnlyCollection(new List<string>());

    public IList<string> CacheKeys
    {
        get
        {
            return _CacheKeysReadOnly;
        }
    }

    public CacheItem Get(string key)
    {
        CacheItem item = null;
        ReadOnlyCollection<string> keys = _CacheKeysReadOnly;
        if (!keys.Contains(key))
        {
            lock (_SynchObj)
            {
                keys = _CacheKeysReadOnly;
                if (!keys.Contains(key))
                {
                    item = new CacheItem();
                    item.ExpensiveLoad();
                    _Cache.Add(key, item);
                    List<string> newKeys = new List<string>(_CacheKeysReadOnly);
                    newKeys.Add(key);
                    _CacheKeysReadOnly = newKeys.AsReadOnly();
                }
            }
        }
        return item;
    }
}

As an alternative if you already on .Net 4.5 you could also think about using the IReadOnlyList<T> interface for the CacheKeys property.

share|improve this answer
    
The purpose of this cache is only to read elements and create them if don't exist. So for now I only need access thru the Get method. Anyway thanks for the advice. P.S. are you really sure I don't need the volatile keyword? There still are read calls on CacheKeys(witch I suppose would be static) outside the lock. – user1667010 Sep 13 '12 at 13:15
    
@user1667010: Their will be reads, but nobody can change the list, it is read-only. So we have an immutable list and and it only be exchanged against a new list, when the new list is ready (and boxed as read-only). The worst thing that could happen is that a consumer gets an old list (when accessing the public property) where the recently added item is not available, but that could already happened beforehand too, regardless if you use volatile or not. For the Get() method the volatile is not needed cause you already have the lock-statement. – Oliver Sep 13 '12 at 14:32
    
_CacheKeysReadOnly can still change between the assignment to keys and the call to keys.Contains(key) on another thread. This is no more thread-safe than the original. – Peter Ritchie Sep 13 '12 at 15:17
    
@PeterRitchie: But for this case the lock takes care and the second assignment and lookup of keys. – Oliver Sep 14 '12 at 13:48

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