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Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

static volatile int t=0;

int main(void){
    int i;
    for (i=0; i<2; i++){
        fork();
        printf("pid:%d: addr:%d val:%d\n", getpid(), &t, t++);
    }
    printf("pid:%d: addr:%d val:%d\n", getpid(), &t, t++);
    return 0;
}

the output like that:

pid:16232: addr:134518684 val:0
pid:16233: addr:134518684 val:0
pid:16232: addr:134518684 val:1
pid:16232: addr:134518684 val:2
pid:16234: addr:134518684 val:1
pid:16234: addr:134518684 val:2
pid:16233: addr:134518684 val:1
pid:16233: addr:134518684 val:2
pid:16235: addr:134518684 val:1
pid:16235: addr:134518684 val:2

The address of global variable t is same, does all threads operate the same variable t? I expect the val was "0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...", how should I do?

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1  
You seem to confuse threads and processes. What your program is doing is create processes, and not threads. The variables in a new process will keep the same address, but not the same values. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 13 '12 at 10:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The results are correct. That's because, when forking, you create a new process that gets a copy of the parent process memory.

The addresses you see are virtual, so, even though they are the same, that doesn't mean they are pointing at the same physical memory zones.

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Although this answer is a copy of Joachim's comment above and my answer... its good that you mentioned the virtual addresses. It might be better to mention that the addresses are those of the actual individual process. –  Brady Sep 13 '12 at 10:27

This is forking a different process, NOT spawning new threads. The result makes sense, since the forked processes will get a copy of the parent process memory.

If its your intention to use forks, this is a more standard way to do it:

int main ()
{
   int pid;

   pid = fork();

   if (pid == 0) {
      // This will be where the child process executes
   } else if (pid > 0) {
     // This is where the parent process executes
   }
   return 0;
}
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You said the addresses are those of the actual individual process, it mean the addresses of pointer point are those of the actual individual process, too. Are there any function to get a share memory for multi-processes and how to mark this memory block? –  solomon_wzs Sep 14 '12 at 7:29
    
@solomon_wzs, you can indeed setup a shared memory segment that can be accessed by multiple processes via IPC. Here is a link: cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/C/node27.html This is different from accessing the "internal" memory of another process, which is not possible to do. –  Brady Sep 14 '12 at 7:48

fork won't produce the result that you expect, for the reasons mentioned by the others. Even if it did spawn a new thread you're not incrementing the variable in a threads-safe manner. If you want to spawn threads and increment a variable in each one you can use pthreads and a mutex like so:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <pthread.h>

int t = 0;
pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

void* threadFunc(void* param) {
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    printf("%d\n", t++);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
}

int main(void){
    int i;
    pthread_t threads[5];
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++){
        pthread_create(&threads[i], NULL, threadFunc, NULL);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++){
        pthread_join(threads[i], NULL);
    }

    pthrad_mutex_destroy(&mutex);
    return 0;
}

All threads share the address space of the parent process (where t is located), so they will all increment the same t.

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