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I have a list of items which I need to process sequentially (but on a separate worker thread so to maintain UI responsiveness). The important thing to note is that these items can run for a long time (5 - 10 seconds).

Task<bool> currentTask = null;

foreach (var item in items)
{
    var currentItem = item;

    // Add a new task to the sequential task queue
    if (currentTask == null)
        currentTask = Task.Factory.StartNew<bool>(() => 
        { 
            return currentItem.ProcessItem(); 
        }, processCancelTokenSource.Token);
    else
        currentTask = currentTask.ContinueWith<bool>(t => 
        { 
            return currentItem.ProcessItem(); 
        }, processCancelTokenSource.Token);

    // Update UI after each task completes
    currentTask.ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        if (t.IsCanceled)
            currentItem.State = State.Cancelled;
        else
        {
            if (t.Result)
                currentItem.State = State.Complete;
            else
                currentItem.State = State.Failed;
        }
    },TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}

Now, I am using a CancellationToken to cancel the processing of the queue (there is a "Cancel Processing" button).

The problem is that this does not cancel the Task which is currently being executed. If CancellationTokenSource.Cancel() is called, then all the tasks waiting to be executed in the queue will be cancelled and their item's currentItem.State will be set to State.Cancelled, which is correct. The problem is that the task which was executing at the time of the cancellation will continue to execute until it is finished and then be set to State.Complete or State.Failed. This is not ideal for two reasons: (1) the task is still running after the cancellation, (2) the state is not set to State.Cancelled because t.IsCanceled is not true.

Is there a way for me to safely cancel/stop the currently executing Task?

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1  
Yeah, just code exactly what you want. There's no magic, secret easy way. You'll have to specify where and how each task that's going to support interruption will be interrupted, likely by checking back into its task structure at convenient points to see if it was cancelled. –  David Schwartz Sep 13 '12 at 10:10
1  
In your ProcessItem method you can pass in your CancellationToken and periodically call the ThrowIfCancellationRequested. –  Andreas Gehrke Sep 13 '12 at 10:27
    
The problem is that I cannot reengineer ProcessItem() in any way. –  davenewza Sep 13 '12 at 10:34
2  
In that case there is no way to terminate it. You can't even use Thread.Abort() on it (since you have a Task, which doesn't give you access to a Thread). In any case, Thread.Abort() is the work of the devil... –  Matthew Watson Sep 13 '12 at 10:49
1  
If you can't change the ProcessItem method, you should store the return value in a temp variable. Call ThrowIfCancellationRequested on your token and then return the temp variable. –  Andreas Gehrke Sep 13 '12 at 11:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tasks supports graceful cancellation pattern. CancellationToken is just a token. It doesn't interrupt any executing code or aborting a thread. You should check this token in task body yourself.

One point to remember: if you want to get your current task cancelled, cancel it via CancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested method, not just exiting from task body.

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Check this msdn article about Task Cancellation. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997396.aspx All you have to do is check if the Task is cancelled inside the Task's working method. Place your check cancellation code in the critical areas of the method. Hope it helps!

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