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I have a tab page that has text boxes, drop downs, check boxes, all of the above in group boxes and some labels. Now i want to clear all the controls when user clicks on a button. How should i implement it? I have searched a lot thinking there would be a standard library method. All i found was some methods with for-each loops(which wont work inside group boxes.) Please guide me on how to proceed with this issue. Basically i want a method like Tabpage.load(); which takes the tab to its initial condition. if possible i want to preserve specific text boxes.

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if you removed a groupBox, it's content will be removed as well and yes the solution is a loop in most cases –  Star Sep 13 '12 at 10:52
    
Wouldn't you be better closing the form and opening it again? –  JMK Sep 13 '12 at 10:52
    
closing my form will result in loss of data in other tabs. I down want that. –  guptat59 Sep 13 '12 at 11:32
    
Edit rolled-back as it invalidates all posted answers. Re-ask this question in a proper way. –  Hans Passant Sep 13 '12 at 11:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all you have to decide what means "clear" for each kind of control. I.e. it could mean set the text to strimg.Empty for the TextBox, set Checked to false for the CheckBox and do nothing for the Label. For a GroupBox clear could mean recursively clear its controls. Once decided what you do you could define a delegate type and create a Dictionary of these delegates where the Type of the control is the key. Now you can loop on the control collection applying the right delegate. The code is simpler than the explanation:

public delegate void ClearControl(Control aCtrl);

private static Dictionary<Type, ClearControl> _clearDelegates;

public static Dictionary<Type, ClearControl> ClearDelegates
{
    get 
    { 
        if (_clearDelegates== null)
            InitializeClearDelegates();
        return _clearDelegates; 
    }
}

private static void InitializeClearDelegates()
{
    _clearDelegates= new Dictionary<Type, ClearControl>();
    _clearDelegates[typeof(TextBox)] = new ClearControl(delegate(Control aCtrl) 
    {
        ((TextBox)aCtrl).Text = string.Empty;
    });
    _clearDelegates[typeof(CheckBox)] = new ClearControl(delegate(Control aCtrl)
    {
        ((CheckBox)aCtrl).Checked = false;
    });
    _clearDelegates[typeof(GroupBox)] = new ClearControl(delegate(Control aCtrl)
    {
        foreach (Control innerCtrl in ((GroupBox)aCtrl).Controls)
            Clear(innerCtrl);
    });
    _clearDelegates[typeof(TabPage)] = new ClearControl(delegate(Control aCtrl)
    {
        foreach (Control innerCtrl in ((TabPage)aCtrl).Controls)
            Clear(innerCtrl);
    });
    // ... other controls
}

public static object Clear(Control aCtrl)
{
    ClearControl aDel;
    if (ClearDelegates.TryGetValue(aCtrl.GetType(), out aDel))
        aDel(aCtrl);
}
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A lot of Winforms programmers get this kind of code wrong. The answers you've gotten so far are no exception. The Controls.Clear() and Controls.Remove() methods are very dangerous. The methods remove the controls from their parent, as intended, but they don't dispose the controls. They get rehosted on an internal hidden window named the "ParkingWindow". To keep the native window alive, ready to be moved to another parent window.

That's a very nice feature, but unfortunately a major source of uncontrollable window handle leaks. Because, by far, the actual intent is to dispose them, not rehost them. To remove a control permanently you must use their Dispose() method. Which also automatically removes them from the Controls collection.

Which is trap number two, you cannot use foreach to iterate the Controls collection. That disposes only the even numbered controls, a side effect of the collection getting modified by the foreach loop. You must iterate it backwards instead, like this:

    public static void UnloadTabpage(TabPage page) {
        for (int ix = page.Controls.Count - 1; ix >= 0; --ix) {
            page.Controls[ix].Dispose();
        }
    }

Also, do not recurse like Justin did. Disposing a control automatically disposes any child controls of that control as well. Perhaps the problem with your group box, it isn't very clear.

Just for kicks, here's another implementation that really drives the point home:

    public static void UnloadTabpage(TabPage page) {
        while (page.Controls.Count > 0) page.Controls[0].Dispose();
    }

But that doesn't easily let you remove controls selectively, like you mentioned you want to do.

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that is really nice answer :), I'm glad i read i. Thank you. –  Star Sep 13 '12 at 12:00
1  
Interesting. One question, if they are rehosted on the ParkingWindow, how would you ever get a reference to them to re-use them? –  Justin Harvey Sep 13 '12 at 12:07
    
you still got the variable name, you can add it using Controls.Add().I've just tried it. and if it's dynamic control that was created in runtime then simply you need to keep it in a list or something, that's your call –  Star Sep 13 '12 at 12:30
    
If you have the variable name, or you put it in a list, then you have a reference to it, so it will not get disposed. What I was getting at, was why the control would ever get put in the 'ParkingWindow'? –  Justin Harvey Sep 13 '12 at 14:14
    
As noted, to keep the native Windows window alive. It happens a lot in Winforms programs, there are many properties of controls that require re-creating the window from scratch. Changing the form's ShowInTaskbar property for example. The only way to do that is to call CreateWindowEx() again. The controls are moved to the parking window, the window is destroyed and recreated, the controls are moved back. And of course handy to simply move a control from one container to another. –  Hans Passant Sep 13 '12 at 14:22

use the ControlCollection.Clear() method. MSDN

myTabControl.Controls.Clear()

If you want to preserve certain controls, you can either

  • Remove only the controls you need using enumeration and condition checking.
  • Clear all controls and then readd only the ones you want to keep.

It depends on how many controls you want to keep vs. how many you want to remove.

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the above method clears the controls. I just want to clear the value inside the control. And enum wont work inside groupbox. –  guptat59 Sep 13 '12 at 11:33
    
Oh by your wording I was sure you are trying to remove controls, not reset them to default value. See this SO question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6673263/… –  Rotem Sep 13 '12 at 11:37

This works for me, GroupBox included,

    void ClearControls(Control parent)
    {
        while (parent.Controls != null && parent.Controls.Count > 0)
        {
            ClearControls(parent.Controls[0]);
            parent.Controls.Remove(parent.Controls[0]);
        }
    }
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Where is the ClearControls method.? (namespace?!) –  guptat59 Sep 13 '12 at 11:38
    
@guptat59 hey can't you see he just defined it? void ClearControls(Control parent) –  Star Sep 13 '12 at 12:04
    
oops...my bad. but this ain't working for group box. –  guptat59 Sep 13 '12 at 14:11

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