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To get a grip on AngularJS I decided to play around with one of the examples, specifically, simply adding a "complete" screen to the Todo-example, when the user has entered 5 todos it uses a switch-case to switch to another div. Code is available here http://jsfiddle.net/FWCHU/1/ if it's of any use.

However, it appears that each switch-case gets its own scope ($scope.todoText is not available), however it can be accessed using "this" from within addTodo() in this case. So far so good, but say I want to access todoText (which is inside the switch-case) outside of the switch-case, how would I go about doing that? Can I bind the switch-case scope to the model perhaps, is it accessible in some other way or should this be solved in some other way?

PS. I'm not trying to find ANY solution to the code above, I'm pretty sure I know how to solve it without using switch-cases, I want to understand how scopes work in this case!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Mark has some great suggestions! Make sure you also check out the AngularJS Batarang Chrome Extension to see the various scopes and their values (among other things). Note it doesn't appear to work well with jsFiddle.

I'm not sure how to access inner scopes directly but here is one way to access the same text in the outer scope by binding to an object instead of a primitive.

1) Declare todoText as an object instead of a primitive in your controller:

$scope.todoText = {text: ''};

2) Bind to todoText.text instead of just todoText:

<form ng-submit="addTodo()">
    <input type="text" ng-model="todoText.text" size="30" placeholder="add new todo here">
    <input class="btn-primary" type="submit" value="add">
</form>

3) Modify the existing functions to use todoText.text:

$scope.addTodo = function() {
    $scope.todos.push({text:$scope.todoText.text, done:false, width: Math.floor(Math.random() * 100) + 50});
    $scope.todoText.text = '';
};

Take a look at this fiddle and note that the text displayed beneath the textbox when you type something in is accessing the todoText.text on the outside scope.

If you change the code back to use a primitive (like in this fiddle) the parent scope todoText won't reflect any changes you make to the textbox. This is likely more to do with how JavaScript copies reference values (see this post for more info) and less an AngularJS specific thing.

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Thank you! That's exactly what I was looking for, the reason todoText works when you bind it as an object (todoText.text) is that it searches for an existing object-attribute I assume, in any parent scope? As opposed to "todoText" where it'll be created in the current scope? –  Andreas Sep 14 '12 at 21:08
2  
I haven't looked at the AngularJS code but I assume when a new scope is created the values are copied to the child scope. With a primitive you get a copy of the value itself whereas with an object it copies the value of the reference pointing to the same object. Primitives are immutable so if the primitive changes in the child scope a new value is created not linked to the parent's primitive value. For an object the reference in both parent and child scopes are the same so any changes to properties are visible in both. This fiddle shows what I'm trying to explain: jsfiddle.net/uQzyh –  Gloopy Sep 14 '12 at 22:36
    
@Gloopy that makes a lot of sense actually. –  Andreas Sep 15 '12 at 11:34
    
I looked at the AngularJS code for ng-switch and ng-repeat. Both have the new child scope prototypically inherit from the parent scope. ng-repeat also copies the loop variable/item to the new child scope (and the nuances that @Gloopy describes with primitives vs object applies). ng-switch does not copy anything from the parent scope. –  Mark Rajcok Dec 8 '12 at 20:43
1  
@adityamenon good catch! Don't think I can update comments here is an updated fiddle: jsfiddle.net/uQzyh/2 –  Gloopy Jul 28 '13 at 17:27
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Update2: Now that I know a little more about AngularJS, here's a much better answer.

say I want to access todoText (which is inside the switch-case) outside of the switch-case, how would I go about doing that?

There is no way for parent scopes to access child scopes. (One reason for this restriction, according to Angular developers, is for easier memory management of scopes.) (Well, you could use $$childHead and $$childTail to access child scope, but you shouldn't!)

Can I bind the switch-case scope to the model perhaps, is it accessible in some other way or should this be solved in some other way?

There are three common ways to access the parent model from the child scope:

  1. Do what @Gloopy suggests: create an object in the parent scope, then refer to properties on that object in the child scope.
  2. Use $parent in the child scope to access the parent scope and its properties, even primitive properties.
  3. Call a method on the parent scope

To convert your fiddle to use $parent:

<input type="text" ng-model="$parent.todoText" ...

$scope.addTodo = function() {
   $scope.todos.push({text: $scope.todoText, ...
   $scope.todoText = '';

As I mentioned in the comments on Gloopy's answer, ng-repeat and ng-switch both have the new child scope prototypically inherit from the parent scope. ng-repeat also copies the loop variable/item to the new child scope (and the nuances that @Gloopy describes with primitives vs object applies). ng-switch does not copy anything from the parent scope.

To see what the inner/child scope looks like, add the following after the ng-switch-when:

<a ng-click="showScope($event)">show scope</a>

and add this to your controller:

$scope.showScope = function(e) {
    console.log(angular.element(e.srcElement).scope());
}

Update1: (strikethroughs added to bad advice, []'s added for clarity)

For this scenario, where AngularJS is creating additional inner scopes (implicitly), and you don't really want/need another controller, I like Gloopy's solution. A service (what I originally suggested below) is [the wrong way to do this] probably overkill here. I also like that Gloopy's solution does not require the use of 'this' in the controller methods.

Original Answer: (strikethroughs added to bad advice, []'s added for clarity)

To see where scopes are being created (if you haven't tried this already, it is handy):

.ng-scope { margin: 4px; border: 1px dashed red }

To access todoText outside the switch-case (hence outside of its scope), you're essentially asking about inter-controller communication, since multiple scopes are involved. You have a few options, but a service is probably best. Store the data (that needs to be shared) inside the service, and inject that service into each controller that needs access to the data.

For your specific example, I think you'd need to attach a controller to each switch-case and inject the service into it, to get access to the shared data.

See also pass variables between controllers.

The other options:

Using $scope.$parent in the inner scope is [one way to do this -- see Update2 above] not recommended, since then a controller would be making assumptions about how the data is presented.

Using $rootScope is not recommended, except maybe for simple, one-off applications. That shared data may start to take on a life of its own, and $rootScope is not the place for that to happen. Services are easier to reuse, to add behavior to, etc.

Using $scope.$emit is another option, but it seems messy and a bit odd: emitting events to share data (instead of triggering behavior).

[Using an object in the parent scope is probably best -- see @Gloopy's answer.]

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I would like to accept this answer as well, but sadly I cannot. I chose to accept the other one simply because it actually presents a solution. But your information is pure gold, many thanks! –  Andreas Sep 14 '12 at 21:10
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