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I am in a search of some way , using which in ruby code I should be able to create a temp file and then append some ruby code in that, then pass that temp file path to jruby -c to check for any syntax errors.

Currently I am trying the following approach:

script_file = File.new("#{Rails.root}/test.rb", "w+") 
            script_file.print(content)
            script_file.close
command = "#{RUBY_PATH} -c #{Rails.root}/test.rb"
            eval(command);
            new_script_file.close

When I inspect command var, it is properly showing jruby -c {ruby file path}. But when I execute the above piece of code I am getting the following error:

Completed 500 Internal Server Error in 41ms

SyntaxError ((eval):1: dhunknown regexp options - dh):

Let me know if any one has any idea on this.

Thanks, Dean

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1 Answer 1

eval evaluates the string as Ruby code, not as a command line invocation: Since your command is not valid Ruby syntax, you get this exception.

If you want to launch a command in Ruby, you can use %x{} or ``:

output1 = ls

output2 = %x{ls}

Both forms will return the output of the launched command as a String, if you want to process it. If you want this output to be directly displayed in the user terminal, you can use system():

system("ls")

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Yes, I tried the above method also, but it was not giving me output on variable output was coming in the terminal, so i have done the following changes: command = "#{RUBY_PATH} -c #{Rails.root}/test.rb" test_output = #{command} 2>&1 In this way output was coming in test_output variable. –  Dean M Sep 13 '12 at 12:32
    
It is because jruby -c itself prints its diagnostic messages to the error stream STDERR: By default, all the previous form only capture the standard output (STDOUT). If you want to capture the error stream directly, you can use something as IO#popen: IO.popen(command) { |f| f.stderr.read } –  Eureka Sep 13 '12 at 12:43
    
The previous code does not work: To achieve this, Popen3 can be used: mentalized.net/journal/2010/03/08/… –  Eureka Sep 13 '12 at 12:53

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