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I am trying to get a div that resides in a container div to scale the container divs height when the div inside the container gets taller. When the height of the div inside the container gets taller than the container itself it just moves past the bottom of the container. I want the container to scale with the contained div. How do I do this in CSS?

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Graham. What you describe is the default behavior of a DIV, or any block element for that matter. e.g. for the following HTML:

<style type="text/css">
    dl { margin: 0; padding: 0;}

    #container {
        background-color: blue;
        padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px;
    }   

    #inner {
        background-color: red;
    }   
</style>
<div id="container">
    <div id="inner">
        <dl>
            <dt>Stuff</dt>
            <dd>Blah blah blah</dd>
            <dt>Foobar</dt>
            <dd>Bazquux</dd>
        </dl>
    </div>
</div>

You will get the following rendered HTML:

Basic Div

The situation you describe when the container div doesn't expand to contain the inner div occurs when you have floated the inner div. Floating, by definition, breaks a block element out of the constraints of it's containing element. Applying "float: left;" to your #inner element gives the following:

alt text

The solution is to add a block level element at the bottom of the containing div that clears the floated element. This causes the containing div to wrap around this new block level element, and thus your floated elements as well.

e.g.

<style type="text/css">
    dl { margin: 0; padding: 0;}

    #container {
        background-color: blue;
        padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px;
    }   

    #inner {
        background-color: red;
        float: left;
    }   
</style>
<div id="container">
    <div id="inner">
        <dl>
            <dt>Stuff</dt>
            <dd>Blah blah blah</dd>
            <dt>Foobar</dt>
            <dd>Bazquux</dd>
        </dl>
    </div>
    <div style="clear: both;"></div>
</div>

This will give output identical to the first image.

Obviously, this can be a tedious thing to add to the bottom of your container divs if you do a lot of floating.

Using CSS2 you can do this with a simple class definition (and a hack for IE of course):

<style type="text/css">
    dl { margin: 0; padding: 0;}

    #container {
        background-color: blue;
        padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px;
    }

    .clearfix:after {
        content: ".";
        display: block;
        height: 0;
        clear: both;
        visibility: hidden;
    }

    * html .clearfix {height: 1%;}

    #inner {
        background-color: red;
        float: left;
    }
</style>
<div id="container" class="clearfix">
    <div id="inner">
        <dl>
            <dt>Stuff</dt>
            <dd>Blah blah blah</dd>
            <dt>Foobar</dt>
            <dd>Bazquux</dd>
        </dl>
    </div>
</div>

Simply add the clearfix class to any of your container divs that contain floated elements. Note the "* html" is the hack required by IE.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not address his problem, which is unfortunate because it appears you put quite a bit of effort into the answer. Put a height of 500px on #container and you'll realize. – Josh Stodola Aug 6 '09 at 19:26
    
Not sure I understand his problem as well as you then. Questions without code = open to interpretation. – hobodave Aug 6 '09 at 19:56
1  
My personal favorite solution to this problem is to add a clearing element at the end of your floated elements. If you add <div style="clear:both;"></div> right before you end your container that will set its height correctly. Don't have to use any CSS hacks, but it does add extra elements to your HTML. – dmertl Aug 6 '09 at 22:43

You just need to give height property by percent such as:

percent { display:block:height:100%; } as your div stands in html:

<div class="percent"></div>
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Simply add

overflow: auto;

to the outer div.

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If you mean "scale" as in just simply expanding, perhaps I read your description as the container div having a height of, say, 500px, and the contained divs will push this out more if they grow too large. In that case, perhaps you can use min-height instead?

min-height: 500px;

If you mean "scale" as in the container div is 500x500px, the contained takes up an initial height of 200px that expands to 400px with more content, which pushes the container div to 1000x1000px (akin to zooming/enlarging), then that might be more complicated.

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