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In languages like Java and C#, strings are immutable and it can be computationally expensive to build a string one character at a time. In said languages, there are library classes to reduce this cost such as C# System.Text.StringBuilder and Java java.lang.StringBuilder.

Does php (4 or 5; I'm interested in both) share this limitation? If so, are there similar solutions to the problem available?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 48 down vote accepted

No, there is no type of stringbuilder class in PHP, since strings are mutable.

That being said, there are different ways of building a string, depending on what you're doing.

echo, for example, will accept comma-separated tokens for output.

// This...
echo 'one', 'two';

// Is the same as this
echo 'one';
echo 'two';

What this means is that you can output a complex string without actually using concatenation, which would be slower

// This...
echo 'one', 'two';

// Is faster than this...
echo 'one' . 'two';

If you need to capture this output in a variable, you can do that with the output buffering functions.

Also, PHP's array performance is really good. If you want to do something like a comma-separated list of values, just use implode()

$values = array( 'one', 'two', 'three' );
$valueList = implode( ', ', $values );

Lastly, make sure you familiarize yourself with PHP's string type and it's different delimiters, and the implications of each.

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15  
And use single-quotes whenever possible. –  Stephen Dec 29 '10 at 23:15
    
why not double quotes? –  gekannt Oct 5 '13 at 15:52
2  
@gekannt Because PHP expands/interprets variables as well as extra escape sequences in strings that are enclosed in double quotes. For example, $x = 5; echo "x = $x"; would print x = 5 while $x = 5; echo 'x = $x'; would print x = $x. –  samitny Oct 10 '13 at 19:37
    
one can need it to be expanded as well as not to be expanded/interpret, it depends upon the situation –  gekannt Oct 11 '13 at 18:31
2  
Bit of a myth, the single quote thing: nikic.github.io/2012/01/09/… –  alimack Apr 3 at 11:48

When you do a timed comparison, the differences are so small that it isn't very relevant. It would make more since to go for the choice that makes your code easier to read and understand.

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2  
Indeed, worrying about this is just outright silly, when there are usually far more important issues to worry about, like database design, big O() analysis, and proper profiling. –  DGM Sep 24 '08 at 4:18
1  
That is very true, but I HAVE seen situations in Java and C# where using a mutable string class (vs. s += "blah") have indeed increased performance dramatically. –  Pete Alvin Sep 29 '10 at 0:46

I know what you're talking about. I just created this simple class to emulate the Java StringBuilder class.

class StringBuilder {

private $str = array();

public function __construct() { }

public function append($str) {
    $this->str[] = $str;
}

public function toString() {
    return implode($this->str);
}

}

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7  
Nice solution. At the end of the append function you can add return $this; to allow method chaining: $sb->append("one")->append("two");. –  Jabba Dec 3 '10 at 21:20
3  
This is completely unnecessary in PHP. In fact, I'm willing to bet that this is significantly slower than doing regular concatenation. –  ryeguy Apr 27 '11 at 14:55
5  
ryeguy: true, being that strings are mutable in PHP this method is "unnecessary", the person asked for a similar implementation to Java's StringBuilder, so here you go... I wouldn't say it's "significantly" slower, I think you're being a little dramatic. The overhead of instantiating a class that manages the string building may include costs, but the usefulness of the StringBuilder class can be expanded to include additional methods on the string. I'll look into what additional overhead is realized by implementing something like this in a class and try to post back. –  ossys May 11 '11 at 3:22
2  
... and he was never heard from again. –  Nigralbus Nov 7 '13 at 15:59

I was curious about this, so I ran a test. I used the following code:

<?php
ini_set('memory_limit', '1024M');
define ('CORE_PATH', '/Users/foo');
define ('DS', DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR);

$numtests = 1000000;

function test1($numtests)
{
    $CORE_PATH = '/Users/foo';
    $DS = DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR;
    $a = array();

    $startmem = memory_get_usage();
    $a_start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $numtests; $i++) {
        $a[] = sprintf('%s%sDesktop%sjunk.php', $CORE_PATH, $DS, $DS);
    }
    $a_end = microtime(true);
    $a_mem = memory_get_usage();

    $timeused = $a_end - $a_start;
    $memused = $a_mem - $startmem;

    echo "TEST 1: sprintf()\n";
    echo "TIME: {$timeused}\nMEMORY: $memused\n\n\n";
}

function test2($numtests)
{
    $CORE_PATH = '/Users/shigh';
    $DS = DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR;
    $a = array();

    $startmem = memory_get_usage();
    $a_start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $numtests; $i++) {
        $a[] = $CORE_PATH . $DS . 'Desktop' . $DS . 'junk.php';
    }
    $a_end = microtime(true);
    $a_mem = memory_get_usage();

    $timeused = $a_end - $a_start;
    $memused = $a_mem - $startmem;

    echo "TEST 2: Concatenation\n";
    echo "TIME: {$timeused}\nMEMORY: $memused\n\n\n";
}

function test3($numtests)
{
    $CORE_PATH = '/Users/shigh';
    $DS = DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR;
    $a = array();

    $startmem = memory_get_usage();
    $a_start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $numtests; $i++) {
        ob_start();
        echo $CORE_PATH,$DS,'Desktop',$DS,'junk.php';
        $aa = ob_get_contents();
        ob_end_clean();
        $a[] = $aa;
    }
    $a_end = microtime(true);
    $a_mem = memory_get_usage();

    $timeused = $a_end - $a_start;
    $memused = $a_mem - $startmem;

    echo "TEST 3: Buffering Method\n";
    echo "TIME: {$timeused}\nMEMORY: $memused\n\n\n";
}

function test4($numtests)
{
    $CORE_PATH = '/Users/shigh';
    $DS = DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR;
    $a = array();

    $startmem = memory_get_usage();
    $a_start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $numtests; $i++) {
        $a[] = "{$CORE_PATH}{$DS}Desktop{$DS}junk.php";
    }
    $a_end = microtime(true);
    $a_mem = memory_get_usage();

    $timeused = $a_end - $a_start;
    $memused = $a_mem - $startmem;

    echo "TEST 4: Braced in-line variables\n";
    echo "TIME: {$timeused}\nMEMORY: $memused\n\n\n";
}

function test5($numtests)
{
    $a = array();

    $startmem = memory_get_usage();
    $a_start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $numtests; $i++) {
        $CORE_PATH = CORE_PATH;
        $DS = DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR;
        $a[] = "{$CORE_PATH}{$DS}Desktop{$DS}junk.php";
    }
    $a_end = microtime(true);
    $a_mem = memory_get_usage();

    $timeused = $a_end - $a_start;
    $memused = $a_mem - $startmem;

    echo "TEST 5: Braced inline variables with loop-level assignments\n";
    echo "TIME: {$timeused}\nMEMORY: $memused\n\n\n";
}

test1($numtests);
test2($numtests);
test3($numtests);
test4($numtests);
test5($numtests);

... And got the following results. Image attached. Clearly, sprintf is the least efficient way to do it, both in terms of time and memory consumption. EDIT: view image in another tab unless you have eagle vision. enter image description here

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1  
should have 1 more test: similar to test2 but replace . with , (without output buffer, of course) –  Raptor Nov 21 '13 at 7:26
    
Very useful, thank you. String concatenation appears to be the way to go. It makes sense that they'd try and optimize the hell out of that. –  AmadeusDrZaius Sep 18 at 19:03

StringBuilder analog is not needed in PHP.

I made a couple of simple tests:

in PHP:

$iterations = 10000;
$stringToAppend = 'TESTSTR';
$timer = new Timer(); // based on microtime()
$s = '';
for($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++)
{
    $s .= ($i . $stringToAppend);
}
$timer->VarDumpCurrentTimerValue();

$timer->Restart();

// Used purlogic's implementation.
// I tried other implementations, but they are not faster
$sb = new StringBuilder(); 

for($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++)
{
    $sb->append($i);
    $sb->append($stringToAppend);
}
$ss = $sb->toString();
$timer->VarDumpCurrentTimerValue();

in C# (.NET 4.0):

const int iterations = 10000;
const string stringToAppend = "TESTSTR";
string s = "";
var timer = new Timer(); // based on StopWatch

for(int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
{
    s += (i + stringToAppend);
}

timer.ShowCurrentTimerValue();

timer.Restart();

var sb = new StringBuilder();

for(int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
{
    sb.Append(i);
    sb.Append(stringToAppend);
}

string ss = sb.ToString();

timer.ShowCurrentTimerValue();

Results:

10000 iterations:
1) PHP, ordinary concatenation: ~6ms
2) PHP, using StringBuilder: ~5 ms
3) C#, ordinary concatenation: ~520ms
4) C#, using StringBuilder: ~1ms

100000 iterations:
1) PHP, ordinary concatenation: ~63ms
2) PHP, using StringBuilder: ~555ms
3) C#, ordinary concatenation: ~91000ms // !!!
4) C#, using StringBuilder: ~17ms

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Java is more or less the same as C# in this. Though the later versions have done some optimization at compile time to help alleviate this. It used to be the case (in 1.4 and earlier, maybe even in 1.6) that if you have 3 or more elements to concatenate, you were better off using a StringBuffer/Builder. Though in a loop, you still need to use the StringBuilder. –  A.Grandt Jan 11 at 9:04

PHP strings are mutable. You can change specific characters like this:

$string = 'abc';
$string[2] = 'a'; // $string equals 'aba'
$string[3] = 'd'; // $string equals 'abad'
$string[5] = 'e'; // $string equals 'abad e' (fills character(s) in between with spaces)

And you can append characters to a string like this:

$string .= 'a';
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I'm no expert in php. Is "$string .= 'a'" not a short form of "$string = $string . 'a'" and is php not creating a new string (and not changing the old one)? –  Wolfgang Adamec Feb 18 '13 at 9:02

Yes. They do. For e.g., if you want to echo couple of strings together, use

echo str1,str2,str3 

instead of

echo str1.str2.str3 
to get it a little faster.

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does this function work this way? $newstring = str1.srt2.str3; echo $newstring; –  JoshFinnie Nov 25 '08 at 17:06

Firstly, if you don't need the strings to be concatenated, don't do it: it will always be quicker to do

echo $a,$b,$c;

than

echo $a . $b . $c;

However, at least in PHP5, string concatenation is really quite fast, especially if there's only one reference to a given string. I guess the interpreter uses a StringBuilder-like technique internally.

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If you're placing variable values within PHP strings, I understand that it's slightly quicker to use in-line variable inclusion (that's not it's official name - I can't remember what is)

$aString = 'oranges';
$compareString = "comparing apples to {$aString}!";
echo $compareString
   comparing apples to oranges!

Must be inside double-quotes to work. Also works for array members (i.e.

echo "You requested page id {$_POST['id']}";

)

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no such limitation in php, php can concatenate strng with the dot(.) operator

$a="hello ";
$b="world";
echo $a.$b;

outputs "hello world"

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1  
That's not what the question is asking.... –  Swati Sep 23 '08 at 21:45
4  
people here is quick on the trigger.. i was typing in the dark.. accidentally hit tab then enter.. –  paan Sep 23 '08 at 21:45

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