Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I receive the following error:

fatal: https://github.com/username/repository-name.git/info/refs not found: did you run git update-server-info on the server?

if I try to push my repository without creating it first on github.com. If I create my repository first on github, then I can push branches no problem. Is this procedure routine? Or am I doing something wrong? I thought a repository could be created locally and pushed without first creating it on github.

share|improve this question
up vote 18 down vote accepted

fatal: https://github.com/username/repository-name.git/info/refs not found: did you run git update-server-info on the server?

In GitHub context, this message should be understood as "The repository doesn't exist". You're supposed to push toward an already existing bare repository. A bare repository is a repository without a working directory, usually found server-side.

If I create my repository first on github, then I can push branches no problem. Is this procedure routine?

Yes. You're supposed to first create your repository on GitHub. See the help topic about this

indeed, as stated by the documentation "To put your project up on GitHub, you'll need to have a GitHub repository for it to live in."

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the quick answer and the link. I going to read the create-a-repo article. – B6431 Sep 13 '12 at 14:18
    
For some reason neither my client git version 1.8.3.4 (Apple Git-47) nor the server git version 1.7.1 (in httpd error logs) prompted with 'did you run git update-server-info on the server'. – Zachary Young Dec 17 '13 at 20:25

I confirm you need to create your repo on GitHub first, before being able to push to said (remote) repo.

Once created, you can add it as a remote named 'origin' to your local repo, and 'git push origin master' (for the first push).

share|improve this answer
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/7311995/… on git push origin master bit. – VonC Sep 13 '12 at 13:57

Also note that the repository name is case sensitive. Oops!

share|improve this answer

Are you sure the git repo you're trying to access supports the HTTPS protocol?

Instead of this: git clone https://github.com/TeaCodie/TeaCodie-Website.git

Try this: git clone git@github.com/TeaCodie/TeaCodie-Website.git

You may need to configure your SSH key.

For some details, see: http://git-scm.com/book/ch4-1.html and https://help.github.com/articles/set-up-git and https://help.github.com/articles/generating-ssh-keys

share|improve this answer

The issue I had was due to the fact that the user didn't have write permission on the master branch.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.