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I'm trying to work out how to get the current line/row number from Ruby CSV. This is my code:

options = {:encoding => 'UTF-8', :skip_blanks => true}
CSV.foreach("data.csv", options, ) do |row, i|
   puts i
end

But this doesn't seem to work as expected. Is there a way to do this?

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You should accept an answer, theTinMan's one deserves it. –  undur_gongor Sep 25 '12 at 11:50
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3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Ruby has a magic variable $. which is the line number of the current file being read:

require 'csv'

CSV.foreach('test.csv') do |csv|
  puts $.
end

If I read:

Year,Make,Model,Description,Price
1997,Ford,E350,"ac, abs, moon",3000.00
1999,Chevy,"Venture ""Extended Edition""","",4900.00
1999,Chevy,"Venture ""Extended Edition, Very Large""","",5000.00
1996,Jeep,Grand Cherokee,"MUST SELL!\nair, moon roof, loaded",4799.00

with the code above, I get:

1
2
3
4
5

$. is used all the time in Perl. In Ruby, it's recommended we use it the following way to avoid the "magical" side of it:

require 'english'

puts $INPUT_LINE_NUMBER
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Wow, that's cool. –  undur_gongor Sep 13 '12 at 19:16
    
this had unexpected results in rspec –  James Sep 19 '13 at 17:15
    
This wasn't written to work in rspec. It works in regular Ruby. –  the Tin Man Sep 19 '13 at 19:10
    
Any idea what happens when you use the headers: true option. Is the first line still 1 or is it 2? –  Josh Pinter Oct 25 '13 at 6:19
    
FYI, if you use the headers: true option, the first row returns 2. –  Josh Pinter Oct 25 '13 at 6:52
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Here's an alternative solution:

options = {:encoding => 'UTF-8', :skip_blanks => true}

CSV.read("data.csv", options).each_with_index do |row, i|
   puts i
end
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1  
Yes, this works and is clean. But it requires reading the whole CVS content into RAM at once. This is what read does. –  undur_gongor Sep 13 '12 at 18:57
1  
According to the CSV documentation, read actually slurps the data in. http://ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.2/libdoc/csv/rdoc/CSV.html –  Josh Voigts Sep 13 '12 at 19:06
3  
You want to say, that "slurp" somehow means lazy reading? I doub't that. The result of the read is an Array and as far as I know there is no way to have deferred array building in Ruby. –  undur_gongor Sep 13 '12 at 19:14
    
Makes sense, I took it to be that, but you're probably right... –  Josh Voigts Sep 13 '12 at 19:22
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Not a clean but a simple solution

options = {:encoding => 'UTF-8', :skip_blanks => true}
i = 0
CSV.foreach("data.csv", options) do | row |
  puts i
  i += 1
end
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Hmm - Thought I tried that. But thanks it works OK for now. –  user1513388 Sep 13 '12 at 13:55
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