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I'm trying to work out how to get the current line/row number from Ruby CSV. This is my code:

options = {:encoding => 'UTF-8', :skip_blanks => true}
CSV.foreach("data.csv", options, ) do |row, i|
   puts i
end

But this doesn't seem to work as expected. Is there a way to do this?

share|improve this question
up vote 72 down vote accepted

Ruby has a magic variable $. which is the line number of the current file being read:

require 'csv'

CSV.foreach('test.csv') do |csv|
  puts $.
end

If I read:

Year,Make,Model,Description,Price
1997,Ford,E350,"ac, abs, moon",3000.00
1999,Chevy,"Venture ""Extended Edition""","",4900.00
1999,Chevy,"Venture ""Extended Edition, Very Large""","",5000.00
1996,Jeep,Grand Cherokee,"MUST SELL!\nair, moon roof, loaded",4799.00

with the code above, I get:

1
2
3
4
5

$. is used all the time in Perl. In Ruby, it's recommended we use it the following way to avoid the "magical" side of it:

require 'english'

puts $INPUT_LINE_NUMBER

If it's necessary to deal with embedded line-ends in fields, it's easily handled by a minor modification. Assuming a CSV file "test.csv" which contains a line with an embedded new-line:

Year,Make,Model,Description,Price
1997,Ford,E350,"ac, abs, moon",3000.00
1999,Chevy,"Venture ""Extended Edition""","",4900.00
1996,Jeep,Grand Cherokee,"MUST SELL!
air, moon roof, loaded",4799.00
1999,Chevy,"Venture ""Extended Edition, Very Large""","",5000.00

Using Enumerator's with_index(1) makes it easy to keep track of the number of times CSV yields to the block, effectively simulating using $. but honoring CSV's work when reading the extra lines necessary to deal with the line-ends:

require 'csv'

CSV.foreach('test.csv', headers: true).with_index(1) do |row, ln|
  puts '%-3d %-5s %-26s %s' % [ln, *row.values_at('Make', 'Model', 'Description')]
end

Which, when run, outputs:

$ ruby test.rb
1   Ford  E350                       ac, abs, moon
2   Chevy Venture "Extended Edition"
3   Jeep  Grand Cherokee             MUST SELL!
air, moon roof, loaded
4   Chevy Venture "Extended Edition, Very Large"
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's cool. – undur_gongor Sep 13 '12 at 19:16
1  
this had unexpected results in rspec – James Sep 19 '13 at 17:15
    
This wasn't written to work in rspec. It works in regular Ruby. – the Tin Man Sep 19 '13 at 19:10
1  
FYI, if you use the headers: true option, the first row returns 2. – Josh Pinter Oct 25 '13 at 6:52
2  
Rather than say "don't use this", explain why in a separate answer. Help educate. – the Tin Man Dec 14 '15 at 20:32

Here's an alternative solution:

options = {:encoding => 'UTF-8', :skip_blanks => true}

CSV.foreach("data.csv", options).with_index do |row, i|
   puts i
end
share|improve this answer
4  
Yes, this works and is clean. But it requires reading the whole CVS content into RAM at once. This is what read does. – undur_gongor Sep 13 '12 at 18:57
1  
According to the CSV documentation, read actually slurps the data in. http://ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.2/libdoc/csv/rdoc/CSV.html – Josh Voigts Sep 13 '12 at 19:06
5  
You want to say, that "slurp" somehow means lazy reading? I doub't that. The result of the read is an Array and as far as I know there is no way to have deferred array building in Ruby. – undur_gongor Sep 13 '12 at 19:14
    
Makes sense, I took it to be that, but you're probably right... – Josh Voigts Sep 13 '12 at 19:22
    
Indeed to slurp usually means to read all at once on this context. – sschuberth Nov 20 '15 at 9:52

Not a clean but a simple solution

options = {:encoding => 'UTF-8', :skip_blanks => true}
i = 0
CSV.foreach("data.csv", options) do | row |
  puts i
  i += 1
end
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm - Thought I tried that. But thanks it works OK for now. – user1513388 Sep 13 '12 at 13:55
    
As far as I know this is the only way to get the row number, not the line number but, you should offset i by 1 if :headers => true. – sshaw Mar 29 at 21:51
    
Using with_index would be a cleaner, more Ruby-like, solution. – the Tin Man Mar 29 at 22:45

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