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I need to get the count of items specified in a string[] which satisfies my condition. So, I tried Predicate and defined my condition using the same. But my code is not working. Can anyone please help me?

string[] books = new string[] { "Java", "SQL", "OOPS Concepts", "DotNet Basics"};

Predicate<string> longBooks = delegate(string book) { return book.Length > 5; };
int numberOfBooksWithLongNames = books.Count(longBooks);

When I run this, it shows a compile time error. Please see below:

'string[]' does not contain a definition for 'Count' and the best extension method overload 'System.Linq.Enumerable.Count(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable, System.Func)' has some invalid arguments

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2  
please add details about why it's not working –  CharlesB Sep 13 '12 at 14:24
1  
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Sep 13 '12 at 14:25
2  
Rather than using a anon delegate like that you can use a lambda books.Count(book => book.Length > 5) just reads better. –  Saint Gerbil Sep 13 '12 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The LINQ Count() method does not take a Predicate as a parameter. In your case the method takes a delegate of type Func<string, bool>. So there are a couple ways you can fix your code, the simplest would probably be to do what others have suggested and use a lambda. Or, using your original code just change Predicate<string> to Func<string, bool>:

string[] books = new string[] { "Java", "SQL", "OOPS Concepts", "DotNet Basics"};

Func<string, bool> longBooks = delegate(string book) { return book.Length > 5; };
int numberOfBooksWithLongNames = books.Count(longBooks);
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Perfect Thanks!!! –  user972255 Sep 13 '12 at 14:35

Try this:

var result = books.Count(x => x.Length > 5);

When doing this without lambdas anonymous methods define a method (your predicate):

public bool IsThisALongBookTitle(string book)
{
    return book.Length > 5;
}

The use it:

var result = books.Count(IsThisALongBookTitle);
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Can you please let me know how I can do this using Predicate. –  user972255 Sep 13 '12 at 14:32
    
This in fact is a predicate, but I edited my post to show how this works without lambdas and anonymous methods. –  Spontifixus Sep 13 '12 at 14:36
    
Well in fact this is a Func<string, bool>, but that has the same method signature as a Predicate<string>... –  Spontifixus Sep 13 '12 at 14:41

There are two problems

string[]' does not contain a definition for 'Count' and the best extension method
 overload 'System.Linq.Enumerable.Count<TSource>
(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<TSource>, System.Func<TSource,bool>)' 
has some invalid arguments

and

Argument 2: cannot convert from 'System.Predicate<string>' to 
'System.Func<string,bool>'

These solutions work

int numberOfBooksWithLongNames = books.AsEnumberable().Count(s => longBooks(s));
int numberOfBooksWithLongNames = new List<string>(books).Count(s => longBooks(s));
int numberOfBooksWithLongNames = books.Count(s => longBooks(s));
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Thanks for your help. Also, the first one didn't work but the other 2 works fine. It gives this error, 'System.Array' does not contain a definition for 'AsEnumberable' and no extension method 'AsEnumberable' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Array' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  user972255 Sep 13 '12 at 14:45
    
have you referenced System.Core assembly and used the proper namespances? try new List<string>{"c", "b", "a"}.OrderBy(s => s); If the code won't compile, then you must check usings and referenced assemblies. –  Karel Frajtak Sep 13 '12 at 15:15

You can try with

books.Count(a = > a.Length > 5);
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