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I know that we can develop Windows Desktop XAML (WPF) apps in Visual Studio Ultimate 2012 RC in C#, VB - but why can't we do the same in C++???

I see that C++ has the ability to do Win32 projects, MFC and METRO apps, but why not normal WPF DESKTOP apps?

How can we get WPF for the Desktop back, in C++?


I tried right-clicking my solution and Adding an XAML file to the project - but there is no such file available to add through the Add file dialog for C++ apps.

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possible answer –  Jordy van Eijk Sep 13 '12 at 14:56
    
Yeah, possibly. I just read over it; still doesn't really answer my question though. That question was posted in Jan, 2011; not really sure which version of VS that was referring to –  Aeron Sep 13 '12 at 15:01
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Neither the RTM nor Visual Studio 2010/2008 allow you to write standard WPF applications in C++ (so there is no 'getting WPF for the desktop back in C++' because it never existed in the first place.

As for the why, only Microsoft would be able to say.

I'd suspect it's to do with how heavily WPF relies on reflection and some of the dynamic features of C# that C++ doesn't have (and that Metro apps don't rely upon due to the more restricted framework) - but this is purely speculation.

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Sigh. Why can't I just choose something and not have it spew crap in my face for a change? –  Aeron Sep 13 '12 at 15:04
    
Why do you need to use C++ anyway? C# is far better suited for developing WPF applications (No LINQ when using C++ without jumping through several hoops for example) –  PhonicUK Sep 13 '12 at 15:19
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Yeah I know. I've been using C# for ages now and just couldn't wait to make new apps in C++ again. It's been a while –  Aeron Sep 13 '12 at 16:36
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