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I am writing a query to search mysql table using full-text search :

select title, 
  MATCH(title,sidebarTxt,introTxt,fullTxt) AGAINST ('MY KEYWORDS' IN NATURAL LANGUAGE MODE) AS score 
from tbl_news
where (status='published') 
order by score DESC

The above query is working perfectly. But, if I try to use 'score' in the where clause MySql is throwing me error "#1054 - Unknown column 'score' in 'where clause'. Here is the code that is not working :

select title, 
  MATCH(title,sidebarTxt,introTxt,fullTxt) AGAINST ('MY KEYWORDS' IN NATURAL LANGUAGE MODE) AS score 
from tbl_news
where status='published' and score > 0 
order by score DESC

I would be really grateful if you could help me to understand it.

share|improve this question
    
What error is it throwing? –  Kermit Sep 13 '12 at 14:58
    
Which error do you get? –  Jeroen Moons Sep 13 '12 at 14:58
    
It is giving me following error : #1054 - Unknown column 'score' in 'where clause'. Thanx –  sudip Sep 13 '12 at 14:59
1  
What is the where clause you're trying to that give you this error? Please give us the query you ARE doing that give the error. –  d-_-b Sep 13 '12 at 15:00
    
@iight is right. This works as expected. –  iMat Sep 13 '12 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

You cannot use score in the WHERE clause if score is a calculated column. You must set it in an additional HAVING clause to apply the condition after the calculation:

SELECT title, 
  MATCH(title,sidebarTxt,introTxt,fullTxt)
      AGAINST ('MY KEYWORDS' IN NATURAL LANGUAGE MODE) AS score 
FROM tbl_news
WHERE status='published'
HAVING score > 0
ORDER BY score DESC;

A test case (with a different table). Here host is a column, host2 is a derived column. Of course column derivation and selection are bogus and make little sense:

mysql> use mysql;
Database changed
mysql> select host, UPPER(host) as host2 FROM user WHERE host = 'nottingham';
+------------+------------+
| host       | host2      |
+------------+------------+
| nottingham | NOTTINGHAM |
+------------+------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select host, UPPER(host) as host2 FROM user WHERE host = 'nottingham' AND host2 = 'NOTTINGHAM';
ERROR 1054 (42S22): Unknown column 'host2' in 'where clause'
mysql> select host, UPPER(host) as 'host2' FROM user WHERE host = 'nottingham' AND host2 = 'NOTTINGHAM';
ERROR 1054 (42S22): Unknown column 'host2' in 'where clause'
mysql> select host, UPPER(host) as `host2` FROM user WHERE host = 'nottingham' AND host2 = 'NOTTINGHAM';
ERROR 1054 (42S22): Unknown column 'host2' in 'where clause'

mysql> select host, UPPER(host) as host2 FROM user WHERE host = 'nottingham' HAVING host2 = 'NOTTINGHAM';
+------------+------------+
| host       | host2      |
+------------+------------+
| nottingham | NOTTINGHAM |
+------------+------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes this one is correct. Adding quotes was suppressing my error but could not solve it as I was getting empty result. Now it makes sense. Thank you.... –  sudip Sep 13 '12 at 15:22
    
Thanks Iserni! Very helpful –  d-_-b Sep 13 '12 at 16:53

The problem is that the score value is not known for all rows until the query finished running. Therefore, this is not possible to apply a condition on score using the WHERE clause. The ORDER BY is executed after all result rows have been computed, so there is no problem using it.

Try using HAVING:

SELECT title, MATCH(title,sidebarTxt,introTxt,fullTxt) AGAINST ('MY KEYWORDS' IN NATURAL LANGUAGE MODE) AS score
FROM tbl_news
WHERE status='published'
HAVING score > 0
ORDER BY score DESC

The HAVING clause behaves almost like WHERE, with the difference that is executes after the results rows have been computed. At this point, the value of score is known for each result row, and the condition can be applied.

Documentation:
Fulltext search: have a look to the examples, they use HAVING
Syntax of SELECT: have a look at the part about HAVING usage

share|improve this answer
    
I have to upvote your version :-D –  lserni Sep 13 '12 at 15:25

This is very likely a case of the 50% noise case. When you have a word that is in 50% or more of the rows, mysql considers it a noise word and will ignore it when scoring (and therefore ranking). This only applies to the NATURAL LANGUAGE MODE option.

Not to nitpick, but it should work perfectly well without any quotes:

mysql> select * from table1;
+---------+------+------+-------------+
| autonum | ID   | name | metavalue   |
+---------+------+------+-------------+
|       1 |    1 | Rose | Drinker     |
|       2 |    1 | Rose | Nice Person |
|       3 |    1 | Rose | Runner      |
|       4 |    2 | Gary | Player      |
|       5 |    2 | Gary | Funny       |
|       6 |    2 | Gary | NULL        |
|       7 |    2 | Gary | Smelly      |
+---------+------+------+-------------+
7 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select ID, group_concat(coalesce(metavalue,'Empty')) as Test from table1 group by ID order by Test;
+------+----------------------------+
| ID   | Test                       |
+------+----------------------------+
|    1 | Drinker,Nice Person,Runner |
|    2 | Player,Funny,Empty,Smelly  |
+------+----------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> select ID, group_concat(coalesce(metavalue,'Empty')) as Test from table1 group by ID order by Test desc;
+------+----------------------------+
| ID   | Test                       |
+------+----------------------------+
|    2 | Player,Funny,Empty,Smelly  |
|    1 | Drinker,Nice Person,Runner |
+------+----------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Server version: 5.5.24-0ubuntu0.12.04.1 (Ubuntu)

(and this sort of query works perfectly fine on my Windows 5.1.x install at work as well)

share|improve this answer
    
No...Its no 50% noise case. I had to add single quote (may be double quote works too) around 'score'. –  sudip Sep 13 '12 at 15:10
    
I don't think sql likes double quotes...or maybe it's just my experience... –  d-_-b Sep 13 '12 at 15:13
    
@light What double quotes? The question didn't have any quotes in it, and column aliases work fine in an order by statement. –  Fluffeh Sep 13 '12 at 15:15

edit: WRONG

Try adding single quotes to: as 'score'... It seems it doesn't recognize the name you designated that column as.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes its working if I add single quotes. Thanxxxxxxxx.... –  sudip Sep 13 '12 at 15:08
    
did that fix it? –  d-_-b Sep 13 '12 at 15:08
1  
Interesting, I never put quotes around my order by alias and they work fine... Dammit, now I will have to try to figure out why this worked here :( –  Fluffeh Sep 13 '12 at 15:11
1  
It is recommended if you risk using reserved words; usually a backtick is used, AFAIK. I confess, I tend to use neither... @sudip, can you try with HAVING? It is working for me in a simpler setup, so I don't know if I got it right, or merely lucky. –  lserni Sep 13 '12 at 15:16
1  
@iight Adding quotes was suppressing my error but could not solve it as I was getting empty result. Please have a look at Mr. lserni's Post. I had to use having clause as score is a calculate column. –  sudip Sep 13 '12 at 15:24

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