Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to make a barplot for which I need my data in a matrix. I have made some really nice plots before when my matrix looked like this:

       0%   20%   40%   60%  80%
C2   0.22  0.94  1.66  2.38 3.10
CC  -1.38 -0.66  0.06  0.79 1.51
CCW -1.61 -0.87 -0.13  0.62 1.36
P   -1.13 -0.16  0.81  1.78 2.76
PF   0.03  0.72  1.42  2.11 2.80
S2  -2.34 -1.61 -0.88 -0.16 0.57

For the rest of my data, I had to convert it from a dataframe, which I did using as.matrix(df). This matrix looks like this:

     trt   2009     2010      2011     
[1,] "C2"  "9.0525" " 8.1400" " 8.1400"
[2,] "CC"  "5.4200" " 4.7975" " 4.7975"
[3,] "CCW" "4.9675" " 4.0400" " 4.0400"
[4,] "P"   "9.3150" "10.3500" "10.3500"
[5,] "PF"  "9.0950" " 3.3375" " 3.3375"
[6,] "S2"  "3.1725" " 3.1125" " 3.1125"

It won't work with the barplot function. I think I need to remove the index column, but haven't been able to. And what is with the quotes? I though a matrix was a matrix, so I'm not sure what is going on here.

share|improve this question
    
as.matrix(yourdata[,-1]). Because your first column is non-numeric (character or factor), and the columns of matrices have to be all the same types, as.matrix is coercing all the data to be characters. –  Ben Bolker Sep 13 '12 at 15:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The quotes means your matrix is in mode character. This is because matrix, as opposed to data.frame which are superficially similar, can only hold one type. Because alphanumeric characters cannot be converted to numeric, your matrix is in mode character. I would be easier to remove the first column before converting it to matrix and save yourself of converting the matrix to numeric.

m <- as.matrix(df[, -1])

#To add the row.names.

row.names(m) <- df[, 1]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Luciano! That makes sense and your fix worked like a charm. –  Nazer Sep 13 '12 at 15:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.