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I was wondering if someone could help me out with a command;

If have the following script:

<script type="text/javascript">
function show_table(id){
  document.getElementById('table1').style.display='none';
  document.getElementById('table2').style.display='none';
  document.getElementById('table3').style.display='none';
  document.getElementById('table4').style.display='none';
  document.getElementById('table6').style.display='none';
  document.getElementById('table'+id).style.display='block';
}
</script>

And it shows the tables just fine that i have, but now i want to use a command to open two tables at the same time, so with one click on the below reference link;

<a href="#" onclick="show_table(6)">Table6</a>

Is it possible to use it with a double onclick="" command? I would like to open as example table(6) and table(2). What should I write? By the way I can only use javascript, no PHP.

I tried something like this, but is does not do the job

<a href="#" onclick="show_table(6),show_table(2)">Table6 and Table2</a>
share|improve this question
    
You can create two separate functions. –  hjpotter92 Sep 13 '12 at 16:05
1  
what is the relation between the 2 table ids that needs to be open? Is it random? –  Teena Thomas Sep 13 '12 at 16:06
    
If you were going to use that way anyways (2 function calls), you need to separate them with a ;, not a , –  Ian Sep 13 '12 at 18:03
    
Remember to up vote and accept. –  iambriansreed Sep 17 '12 at 15:29

6 Answers 6

Try this version, which can take a number or an array:

function show_table(id) {
    var ix;

    for (ix = 1;  ix <= 6;  ++ix) {
        document.getElementById('table' + ix).style.display='none';
    }
    if (typeof id === "number") {
        document.getElementById('table'+id).style.display='block';
    } else if (id && id.length) {
        for (ix = 0;  ix < id.length;  ++ix) {
            document.getElementById('table'+ix).style.display='block';
        }
    }
}

Then you can say show_table([1, 2]) instead of just show_table(1).

share|improve this answer
    
Why bother doing that when you can just enforce an array? Even if the array would hold a single value? –  Ian Sep 13 '12 at 16:11
    
Because it's wasteful. Creating arrays costs resources and the array will end up in the garbage collector. One of the best things about JavaScript is its type flexibility. You could even make ids a string and check for that. –  Ed Bayiates Sep 13 '12 at 16:14
    
This function would throw errors if given the wrong input. –  iambriansreed Sep 13 '12 at 17:46
2  
@anonymousdownvotingislame any function would throw errors if given the wrong type of input. –  Ian Sep 13 '12 at 17:49
1  
@anonymousdownvotingislame Checking inputs for validity is in no way best practice coding. Scratch that. You're NOT checking inputs for validity at all. You're checking for existence...which isn't necessary either. Most languages require you to explicitly define required parameters (and their types) and optional parameters. The fact that Javascript doesn't, leaves you with the option of adding incredible amounts of unnecessary checking, or allowing failure. Who are you creating the function for? You and your team...so if they don't know how to use it, they shouldn't use it at all. –  Ian Sep 13 '12 at 18:36
    function show_table(ids) {
        var idArr = ids.split(",");
        document.getElementById('table1').style.display='none';
      document.getElementById('table2').style.display='none';
      document.getElementById('table3').style.display='none';
      document.getElementById('table4').style.display='none';
      document.getElementById('table6').style.display='none';

        for(var i = 0; i< idArr.length; i++) {
            document.getElementById('table'+idArr[i]).style.display='block';
        }
    }

<a href="#" onclick="show_table('6,2')">
share|improve this answer
    
+1, though an array would be more strongly-typed :) –  Vikdor Sep 13 '12 at 16:08
1  
With this version you need to remember not to do this: show_table("6, 2") because the space would mess things up. –  Ed Bayiates Sep 13 '12 at 16:10
    
This function would throw errors if given the wrong input. –  iambriansreed Sep 13 '12 at 17:46
1  
@anonymousdownvotingislame That's what you want. The code will bomb if incorrect input is given...SO DON'T GIVE INCORRECT INPUT. –  Ian Sep 13 '12 at 18:09

If you prefer minimum force aproach, try this:

function hide_all_tables(){
    document.getElementById('table1').style.display='none';
    document.getElementById('table2').style.display='none';
    document.getElementById('table3').style.display='none';
    document.getElementById('table4').style.display='none';
    document.getElementById('table6').style.display='none';
}

function show_table(id){
    document.getElementById('table'+id).style.display='block';
}

And then use the code this way:

<a href="#" onclick="hide_all_tables();show_table(6);show_table(2);">Table6 and Table2</a>
share|improve this answer

I have never used a 'double onclick command' and to be honest don't think they work, or are good practice. Why don't you just house both show table comands in a javascript function and call the function onclick?

If i am understanding you correctly.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think they meant two function calls in one onclick...which is what they're trying in their second snippet. –  Ian Sep 13 '12 at 18:38

You can change them all at once without looping, if the tables have logical associations (they must, right?).

The idea is to assign them a class (or multiple classes) and change the whole class at once:

<script>
function f(classname, show)
{
    var mysheet=document.styleSheets[0];

    /* Each class in the styleSheet is called a 'rule' */
    var myrules=mysheet.cssRules;

    var value = show ? '' : 'none'; /* show or hide? */
    for (i=0; i<myrules.length; i++){

        /* find the class we want to change */
        if(myrules[i].selectorText==classname){
            /* change the rule */
            myrules[i].style.display = value;
        }
    }
}
</script>

<style type="text/css" >
.hasPets { color: green; display: none; }
.hasCats { font-weight: bold; display: none; }
</style>

​<button onclick="f('.hasPets', true)">Show Pets</button>
​<button onclick="f('.hasCats', true)">Show Cats</button>
​<button onclick="f('.hasPets', false)">Hide Pets</button>
​<button onclick="f('.hasCats', false)">Hide Cats</button>

<div class="hasPets">Pets</div>
<div class="hasCats hasPets">Cats</div>

In this example, Show Pets shows both, Hide Cats hides only Cats. You can't show only Cats -- Pets overrides it.

Note: I've kept this short for clarity. In practice you'll have to add a few more lines because not all versions of IE support the .cssRules property, I think they called it .rules.

share|improve this answer

This function allows for any number of tables to show.

function show_table(){
    for(var i = 1; i  < 7; i++) // change 7 to the amount of tables 
        if(document.getElementById('table'+i))
            document.getElementById('table'+i).style.display='none';

    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++)
        if(document.getElementById('table'+arguments[i]))
            document.getElementById('table'+arguments[i]).style.display='block';
}

To show tables with ids of table3 and table5 then:

show_table(3,5);
share|improve this answer
    
Even though *sshats down vote this answer with no comment or legitimate reason; I won't delete this answer. I think it's the best one here and I am eager to discuss why it others may not think so. –  iambriansreed Sep 19 '12 at 23:12

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