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I have the following code:

trait CellT[VAL <: AnyVal] {
  var value: VAL
  type NEXT <: AnyVal
  var next: CellT[NEXT]
}

abstract class Cell[VAL <: AnyVal] extends CellT[VAL] {
  var next = this  // defaults to `this`. ERROR
}

// impl example:
class CellInt extends Cell[Int] {
  var value: Int = 0
}

The error says that

overriding variable next in trait CellT of type Cell[Cell.this.NEXT]; variable next has incompatible type

Here it is obvious that this will have the type VAL <: AnyVal which is the same as NEXT <: AnyVal, however, I still get the error. How can I tell Scala that next should be able to return anything of type Cell[A <: AnyVal], but this type should not be necessary the same as the class type parameter [VAL <: AnyVal]??? Otherwise I could just use [VAL] but it will be too restrictive, for example for Cell[Int] it will restrict the next method to return only Cell[Int] type instances. But I want the next to be reassignable to any other Cell[*] types instances.

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1  
"var next: Cell[NEXT]" - I think it's typo, may be "var next: CellT[NEXT]" –  Sergey Passichenko Sep 13 '12 at 16:57
    
No, this is not a type - that's how my code was written. But what you're saying is a more appropriate design, so I will fix it, thank you!!! –  noncom Sep 15 '12 at 8:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want next to be reassignable to any other Cell[*] types instances, you can use existential types:

trait CellT[VAL <: AnyVal] {
  var value: VAL
  var next: CellT[_ <: AnyVal]
}

abstract class Cell[VAL <: AnyVal] extends CellT[VAL] {
  var next: CellT[_ <: AnyVal] = this // defaults to `this`
  override def toString = "Cell(%s,%s)".format(value, if(next == this) "this" else next.toString)
}

// impl example:
class CellInt extends Cell[Int] {
  var value: Int = 0
}

class CellBoolean extends Cell[Boolean] {
    var value = false
}

var c1 = new CellInt
var c2 = new CellBoolean

println(c1)
c1.value = 1
println(c1)
c1.next = c2
println(c1)

println(c2)
c2.value = true
println(c1)
println(c2)

Output:

Cell(0,this)
Cell(1,this)
Cell(1,Cell(false,this))
Cell(false,this)
Cell(1,Cell(true,this))
Cell(true,this)

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That's it, Sergey! I will work further with this approach and see, what I can get to! Thanks! –  noncom Sep 15 '12 at 10:11

This isn't exactly an answer so much as a warning. I wrote remarkably similar code a month ago, and it took me many iterations to learn that when it comes to Scala typing, coarser is better.

Keep in mind that Scala type parameter checking is compile-time only, so it is frequently coarser than you think. It's really annoying to spend 15 minutes getting your code to compile, only to discover that your X[Foo <: Bar] is getting treated as X[_].

I would recommend that you start with:

abstract class Cell[VAL] {
    var value: VAL
    var next: Cell[_]
}

and only get more specific if you have a pressing need. Chances are, if you need to know the type of next, you're going to need to do an explicit runtime check anyway.

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He may have to do a runtime check (i.e., pattern matching), but at least with the constraint he'll know that it's safe. –  Aaron Novstrup Sep 13 '12 at 19:35
    
@AaronNovstrup and David: Haha, you're right! Often, after battling the Scala's type system for a half an hour I have found that simply replacing all the "sophisticated" type stuff with _ does the job :D. And as it turns out, in this case, it is also one of the important parts of the solution. And yes, I also have to do a pattern matching on types later, we'll see, how will it work then. Maybe I will face more problems there. –  noncom Sep 15 '12 at 9:50

Here it is obvious that this will have the type VAL <: AnyVal which is the same as NEXT <: AnyVal

No, they are not the same, they just share the same constraint. NEXT is not yet specified. Imagine that you subsequently subclass Cell like this:

class StringNextCell extends Cell {
    type NEXT = String
}

Now, StringNextCell.next is supposed to be of type Cell[String] but your declaration from Cell declares it as Cell[Int]

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Yes-yes, I have meant that, and that was the problem with the code, I just could not explain the problem as well as you did ) The constraints are the same, but in reality there can be that type divergence as you have pointed out. –  noncom Sep 15 '12 at 9:35

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