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I need to implement the producer/consumer pattern around a fixed-size FIFO queue. I think a wrapper class around a ConcurrentQueue might work for this but I'm not completely sure (and I've never worked with a ConcurrentQueue before). The twist in this is that the queue needs to only hold a fixed number of items (strings, in my case). My application will have one producer task/thread and one consumer task/thread. When my consumer task runs, it needs to dequeue all of the items that exist in the queue at that moment in time and process them.

For what it's worth, processing of the queued items by my consumer is nothing more than uploading them via SOAP to a web app that isn't 100% reliable. If the connection can't be established or the call SOAP call fails, I'm supposed to discard those items and go back to the queue for more. Because of the overhead of SOAP, I was trying to maximize the number of items from the queue that I could send in one SOAP call.

At times, my producer may add items faster than my consumer is able to remove and process them. If the queue is already full and my producer needs to add another item, I need to enqueue the new item but then dequeue the oldest item so that the size of the queue remains fixed. Basically, I need to keep the most recent items that are produced in the queue at all time (even if it means some items don't get consumed because my consumer is currently processing previous items).

With regard to the producer keeping the number if items in the queue fixed, I found one potential idea from this question:

Fixed size queue which automatically dequeues old values upon new enques

I'm currently using a wrapper class (based on that answer) around a ConcurrentQueue with an Enqueue() method like this:

public class FixedSizeQueue<T>
{
    readonly ConcurrentQueue<T> queue = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();

    public int Size { get; private set; }

    public FixedSizeQueue(int size)
    {
        Size = size;
    }

    public void Enqueue(T obj)
    {
        // add item to the queue
        queue.Enqueue(obj);

        lock (this) // lock queue so that queue.Count is reliable
        {
            while (queue.Count > Size) // if queue count > max queue size, then dequeue an item
            {
                T objOut;
                queue.TryDequeue(out objOut);
            }
        }
    }
}

I create an instance of this class with a size limit on the queue like this:

FixedSizeQueue<string> incomingMessageQueue = new FixedSizeQueue<string>(10); // 10 item limit

I start up my producer task and it begins filling the queue. The code in my Enqueue() method seems to be working properly with regard to removing the oldest item from the queue when adding an item causes the queue count to exceed the max size. Now I need my consumer task to dequeue items and process them but here's where my brain gets confused. What's the best way to implement a Dequeue method for my consumer that will take a snapshot of the queue at a moment in time and dequeue all items for processing (the producer may still be adding items to the queue during this process)?

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Why are you concerned about a snapshot? What is the problem with items being concurrently added? If you are worried you could grab too many then stop at Size in the consumer. –  Blam Sep 13 '12 at 16:54
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Simply stated, the ConcurrentQueue has a "ToArray" method which, when entered, will lock the collection and produce a "snapshot" of all current items in the queue. If you want your consumer to be given a block of things to work on, you can lock the same object the enqueueing method has, Call ToArray(), and then spin through a while(!queue.IsEmpty) queue.TryDequeue(out trash) loop to clear the queue, before returning the array you extracted.

This would be your GetAll() method:

public T[] GetAll()
{
    lock (syncObj) // so that we don't clear items we didn't get with ToArray()
    {
        var result = queue.ToArray();
        T trash;
        while(!queue.IsEmpty) queue.TryDequeue(out trash);
    }
}

Since you have to clear out the queue, you could simply combine the two operations; create an array of the proper size (using queue.Count), then while the queue is not empty, Dequeue an item and put it in the array, before returning.

Now, that's the answer to the specific question. I must now in good conscience put on my CodeReview.SE hat and point out a few things:

  • NEVER use lock(this). You never know what other objects may be using your object as a locking focus, and thus would be blocked when the object locks itself from the inside. The best practice is to lock a privately scoped object instance, usually one created just to be locked: private readonly object syncObj = new object();

  • Since you're locking critical sections of your wrapper anyway, I would use an ordinary List<T> instead of a concurrent collection. Access is faster, it's more easily cleaned out, so you'll be able to do what you're doing much more simply than ConcurrentQueue allows. To enqueue, lock the sync object, Insert() before index zero, then remove any items from index Size to the list's current Count using RemoveRange(). To dequeue, lock the same sync object, call myList.ToArray() (from the Linq namespace; does pretty much the same thing as ConcurrentQueue's does) and then call myList.Clear() before returning the array. Couldn't be simpler:

    public class FixedSizeQueue<T>
    {
    private readonly List<T> queue = new List<T>();
    private readonly object syncObj = new object();
    
    public int Size { get; private set; }
    
    public FixedSizeQueue(int size) { Size = size; }
    
    public void Enqueue(T obj)
    {
        lock (syncObj)
        {
            queue.Insert(0,obj)
            if(queue.Count > Size) 
               queue.RemoveRange(Size, Count-Size);
        }
    }
    
    public T[] Dequeue()
    {
        lock (syncObj)
        {
            var result = queue.ToArray();
            queue.Clear();
            return result;
        }
    }
    }
    
  • You seem to understand that you are throwing enqueued items away using this model. That's usually not a good thing, but I'm willing to give you the benefit of the doubt. However, I will say there is a lossless way to achieve this, using a BlockingCollection. A BlockingCollection wraps any IProducerConsumerCollection including most System.Collections.Concurrent classes, and allows you to specify a maximum capacity for the queue. The collection will then block any thread attempting to dequeue from an empty queue, or any thread attempting to add to a full queue, until items have been added or removed such that there is something to get or room to insert. This is the best way to implement a producer-consumer queue with a maximum size, or one that would otherwise require "polling" to see if there's something for the consumer to work on. If you go this route, only the ones the consumer has to throw away are thrown away; the consumer will see all the rows the producer puts in and makes its own decision about each.

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Hi Keith. Thank you very much for the great answer. I had never considered using a List probably because the way that the items are stored seemed "backward" to me but that is a great solution. I've implemented it now and it's working very well. Re: throwing queued items away, I agree that it's certainly not what you'd expect but that's the requirement that I was given (there actually is a reason for it, but not something that I can go into detail about). Thank you again for your great answer. –  user685869 Sep 14 '12 at 13:03
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You don't want to use lock with this. See Why is lock(this) {…} bad? for more details.

This code

// if queue count > max queue size, then dequeue an item
while (queue.Count > Size) 
{
    T objOut;
    queue.TryDequeue(out objOut);
}

suggests that you need to somehow wait or notify the consumer about the item's availability. In this case consider using BlockingCollection<T> instead.

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He's locking critical sections, as he says, because he's performing multiple operations at a time; ConcurrentQueue will lock the collection, do its thing to add or remove one element, then release the lock. That means that if the producer is trying to add while the consumer is trying to clean out elements, things will get lost that don't have to be. All that said, I don't agree with his pattern either. –  KeithS Sep 13 '12 at 16:58
    
Oh, right got it. Make sense. –  oleksii Sep 13 '12 at 17:01
    
Thank you for the feedback. –  user685869 Sep 14 '12 at 12:58
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