Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder if the object created in the usingstatement gets disposed if I perform a return or throw operation. Example as follows.

using(SomeClass thing = new SomeClass())
{
  ...
  if(condition)
    return;
  ...
}

Will the above get confused or is GC to be trusted here?

share|improve this question
4  
Absolutely, that's the whole point of introducing a using block in the first place. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 13 '12 at 16:34
1  
possible duplicate of Usage of a using statement –  Gratzy Sep 13 '12 at 16:37
    
@Grazy Not quite a duplicate. I looked for an answer but didn't find anything exactly like my question. (Maybe there's something but I didn't find it.) Now, there is for sure. Don't be grumpy! ;) –  Konrad Viltersten Sep 13 '12 at 17:34
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, it will. The using statement will result in a finally block being created. A finally block's code will be run even if an exception is thrown in the related try block, or if there is a return statement in that try block.

There are only a few exceptions that can cause a finally block's code to not be executed, and they are all listed here, but my guess is that in your situation you'll be able to live with those consequences.

share|improve this answer
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/10255774/… here are examples –  lukas Sep 13 '12 at 16:38
    
@lukas Thanks for the link, updated the post accordingly. –  Servy Sep 13 '12 at 16:42
    
I like this one the best: "If the power cord is pulled out of the wall then the finally block is never called." I want a walk-around for this one, please! System.User.StopFoolingAround(), haha. :) –  Konrad Viltersten Sep 13 '12 at 17:30
add comment

using is the equivalent of try-finally so, yes, it does.

share|improve this answer
add comment

dispose if it is implemented will always get called. Its the equivalent of calling dispose in a finally block.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 is the more exact explanation –  Alberto León Sep 13 '12 at 16:34
1  
Actually they are all pretty much the same and this question has been asked 100 times –  Gratzy Sep 13 '12 at 16:35
add comment

It will dispose, yes. It will create a finally block in the CIL code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, because using is extended into a try finally by the compiler. The dispose will occur inside the finally block. Also, the finally will contain a test to check if the variables in the using are null (in case there are exceptions on the constructors).

share|improve this answer
add comment

When writing a using statement:

using(SomeClass thing = new SomeClass())
{
    //...
    if (condition)
        return;
    //...
}

this will result in the following code:

SomeClass thing;
try
{
    thing = new SomeClass();
    //...
    if (condition)
        return;
    //...
}
finally
{
    if(thing != null)
    {
        thing.Dispose();
    }
}        

So all object declared using ( /* HERE */ ) will get disposed automatically. Objects declared inside the {} won't. But you can of course nest (or stack) using statements:

using (var thing = new SomeClass())
    using (var another = new Another())
        using (var somethingElse = new Whatever())
        {
            //...
        }

which in turn of course is just the syntactic sugar for writing

using (var thing = new SomeClass())
{
    using (var another = new Another())
    {
        using (var somethingElse = new Whatever())
        {
            //...
        }
    }
}

because when a statement is followed by just one block of code (in this case another using-block) you can skip the curly braces...

When using two or more objects of the same type you can chain the declaratio within the using-statement:

using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(), stream2 = new MemoryStream())
{
    //...
}

(Thanks to @Gratzy for pointing that out)

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually you don't need to nest them you can stack them or include the objects in one statement stackoverflow.com/questions/3506619/… –  Gratzy Sep 13 '12 at 16:48
1  
@Gratzy, true - that is another syntactic sugar for the using statements. Stacking however is just what I wrote, without indentation. ;) –  Spontifixus Sep 13 '12 at 16:53
    
Ah it is, my apologies I saw the indents and read nesting. I included the link because I didn't know you could do that until I ran into that question. –  Gratzy Sep 13 '12 at 16:55
    
@Gratzy rgabjs for pointing that out - I updated the answer –  Spontifixus Sep 13 '12 at 19:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.