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I have the following class hierarchy.

class Header { IEnumerable<Item> Item { get; set; } .... }
class HeaderA : Header { .... } // Item should have the type of IEnumerable<ItemA>
class HeaderB : Header { .... } // Item should have the type of IEnumerable<ItemB>

class Item { .... }
class ItemA : Item { .... }
class ItemB : Item { .... }

Is it possible to have compile time checking on the type of Item to make sure it's IEnumerable<ItemA>, IEnumerable<ItemB> for ItemA and ItemB respectively? Is there any better design?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can change the definition of the Header class to pass the type parameter to it, then you could impose that:

    class Header<TItem> where TItem : Item { IEnumerable<TItem> Item { get; set; } }
    class HeaderA : Header<ItemA> { } // Item should have the type of IEnumerable<ItemA>
    class HeaderB : Header<ItemB> { } // Item should have the type of IEnumerable<ItemB>

    class Item { }
    class ItemA : Item { }
    class ItemB : Item { }
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2  
Would you also consider adding a constraint where TItem : Item? –  Jordão Sep 13 '12 at 16:43
    
That would be a good idea, thanks! –  carlosfigueira Sep 13 '12 at 16:44
    
Perfect now! +1! –  Jordão Sep 13 '12 at 16:48

You should use a Generic Class

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I thought of using generic. However, HeaderA and HeaderB add different members. –  dc7a9163d9 Sep 13 '12 at 16:43
    
see the post of carlosfigueira, you can do that –  Bgi Sep 13 '12 at 16:44
1  
got it. I was thinking the design in Darren's answer. –  dc7a9163d9 Sep 13 '12 at 16:47

You can use a generic type and pass it to the class.

public class Header<T> where T : Item
{
   IEnumerable<T> Item { get; set; }
}


 Header<ItemA> AHeader;
 Header<ItemB> BHeader;

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/library/sz6zd40f(v=vs.100)

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Good approach as well. Do you think a constraint where T : Item would be good? –  Jordão Sep 13 '12 at 16:52
    
@Jordão - I've just added that in. Thanks :-) –  Darren Davies Sep 13 '12 at 16:55
    
+1 Maybe the OP really doesn't need to create Header<T> subclasses if they don't add anything to the base. –  Jordão Sep 13 '12 at 16:58

Like this

class HeaderA : Header<ItemB> { .... }
class HeaderB : Header<ItemA> { .... }
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If I understand your question correctly, you can change the signatures of the Header class to accomplish this.

class Header<ItemType> { IEnumerable<ItemType> Item {get; set;} ....}
class HeaderA : Header<ItemA> { .... }
class HeaderB : Header<ItemB> { .... }

class Item { .... }
class ItemA : Item { .... }
class ItemB : Item { .... }

would result in HeaderA only allowing ItemA objects and HeaderB only allowing ItemB objects to be put into their respective Item collections.

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