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I've been told to use a framework that uses selenium via the following convention:

public static SeleniumClient instance() {



if (_instance == null) {

  _instance = new SeleniumClient();

  LogHelper.instance().setInfo("SeleniumClient::instance(): Singleton created.");

}

return _instance;

}

All of the tests are written in a similar way. For instance, if I were creating a new test, I would write a helper class and this would be how it goes used:

public static PropertyManagerHelper instance() {

if (_instance == null) {

  _instance = new PropertyManagerHelper();

  LogHelper.instance().setInfo("PropertyManagerHelper::instance(): Singleton created.");

}

return _instance;

}

I have a selenium grid that I intend to send these tests too. Before I get too far down the rabbit hole, I have these questions:

How does Selenium send tests to a grid? Does it send the whole class/test or does it send each action as an individual request?

This is probably going to be answered by the previous question, but will this static usage prevent testng from running multiple parallel tests?

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2 Answers 2

Why the Singleton pattern?

It is not thread-safe at it's current state:

http://csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx

I would not suggest the Singleton pattern.

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Yeah, neither would I. I'm gathering data points to help me make the case that it does NOT fit here. –  qkslvrwolf Sep 14 '12 at 19:20
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It sends each command. Selenium doesn't understand whether its a test case or class. Hub would get the command and distribute across the remote controls.

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