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Assume a 32-bit unsigned integer (answers generalizable to any size are of course better). This integer can be assumed to be a power of 2, so only one bit is set. I want set all bits in the integer, except those lower than the set bit. So (using 8-bit integers for brevity) 00001000 would become 11111000.

This could of course be accomplished by finding the one set bit and then iterating through the higher bits, setting them also. Assuming highest_set return the position of the highest set bit:

uint32_t f(uint32_t x)
{
  int n = highest_set(x);
  for (int i = 31; i != n; --i) {
      x |= 1 << i;
  }
  return x;
}

The runtime of f does however depend on the value of x, and I feel that there is a cleverer way of doing this.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Conceptually, an easy thing to do would be to take x-1 and then XOR it with 0xffffffff. Writing it as ~(x-1) as harold did in the comments below will handle different sized integers without having to change what you're XORing with.

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1  
The ~(x - 1) solution you mention would probably be faster on anything modern. Also less code. –  harold Sep 13 '12 at 17:32
    
@harold Agreed. I just removed the part about the lookup table since it feels messier here with no real advantage in most cases. –  David Sep 13 '12 at 17:34

shift right log(value), OR with Bitmask of 1's, shift left log(value). This should be a general solution with same running time for any input, no guarantees though.

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uint32_t f(uint32_t x)
{
  bool bitset=false; //C++
  for (int i =0; i<sizeof(int); i++) {
     if(bitset) //After the first 1
        {  x |= 1 << i; } 
      else
        {
          if(x&(1<<i))
            bitset=true; //if 1 found then the flag is raised
        }

  }
  return x;
}
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an easy to understand solution

while (!(x & 0x80000000))
    x |= x << 1;

This code doesn't need to loop constantly 32 times all the time as many solution above. But ofcourse David's solution above is the fastest one.

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