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Back in the olden days, there were tricks used (often for blitting offscreen framebuffers), to copy large chunks of memory from one location to another.

Now that I'm working in C#, I've found the need to move an array of bytes (roughly 32k in size) from one memory location to another approximately 60 times per second.

Somehow, I don't think a byte by byte copy in a for loop is optimal here.

Does anyone know a good trick to do this kinda of work while still staying in purely managed code?

If not, I'm willing to do some P/Invoking or go into unsafe mode, but I'd like to stay managed if I can for cross platform reasons.

EDIT: Some benchmarking code I wrote up just for fun:

Byte by Byte: 15.6192

4 Bytes per loop: 15.6192

Block Copy: 0

Byte[] src = new byte[65535];
            Byte[] dest = new byte[65535];
            DateTime startTime, endTime;

            startTime = DateTime.Now;
            for (int k = 0; k < 60; k++)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < src.Length; i++)
                {
                    dest[i] = src[i];
                }
            }
            endTime = DateTime.Now;

            Console.WriteLine("Byte by Byte: " + endTime.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds);

            startTime = DateTime.Now;
            for (int k = 0; k < 60; k++)
            {
                int i = 0;
                while (i < src.Length)
                {
                    if (i + 4 > src.Length)
                    {
                        // Copy the remaining bytes one at a time.
                        while(i < src.Length)
                        {
                            dest[i] = src[i];
                            i++;
                        }
                        break;
                    }

                    dest[i] = src[i];
                    dest[i + 1] = src[i + 1];
                    dest[i + 2] = src[i + 2];
                    dest[i + 3] = src[i + 3];

                    i += 4;                    
                }
            }
            endTime = DateTime.Now;

            Console.WriteLine("4 Bytes per loop: " + endTime.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds);

            startTime = DateTime.Now;
            for (int k = 0; k < 60; k++)
            {
                Buffer.BlockCopy(src, 0, dest,0, src.Length);
            }
            endTime = DateTime.Now;

            Console.WriteLine("Block Copy: " + endTime.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds);
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1  
System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch, very cool class which can help. –  user7116 Sep 24 '08 at 1:13
    
Yes, timing using Now is rather useless, unless you do a lot more repeats than you have here, to get the total time used way up. Now() only ticks every 64th of a second on most systems, so all your benchmark establishes is that the first two are > 8 ms and the last < 8 ms. –  McKenzieG1 Sep 24 '08 at 1:24
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think you can count on Buffer.BlockCopy() to do the right thing

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.buffer.blockcopy.aspx

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