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I have defined a super class "Validity" which defines a time span (ValidFrom / ValidTo) in which an object is "valid". It also defines a function that returns true for a given timestamp, iff (=if and only if) a (derived) object is valid at this time.

public class Validity
{
    public int ValidityID { get; set; }

    public DateTime? ValidFrom { get; set; }
    public DateTime? ValidTo { get; set; }

    bool isValidAt(DateTime time)
    {
        return (ValidFrom == null || ValidFrom >= time)
            && (ValidTo == null || ValidTo < time);
    }
}

Now I would like to write some function that checks isValidAt within a LINQ query. I guess this is possible via IQueriable, but I didn't find out how... The following code snipped is what I want to have "working" in some way (especially the where n.isValidAt(t)). So, how can this be achieved?

public class Node : Validity {
    public int NodeID { get; set; }

    public static getFirstNode(DateTime t)
    {
        MyContext db = new MyContext();
        var items = from n in db.Nodes
                     where n.isValidAt(t)
                     orderby n.NodeID descending
                     select n;
        return items.FirstOrDefault<Node>();
    }
}

--- WORKING SOLUTION ---

I needed to adapt the solution of Zaid Masud a bit, to get it working. Note that I had to remove the this in the parameter list (now the method definition is public static IQueryable<T> isValidAt<T>(IQueryable<T> query, DateTime time) where T : Validity). Here is the source code:

public class Validity
{
    public int ValidityID { get; set; }

    public DateTime? ValidFrom { get; set; }
    public DateTime? ValidTo { get; set; }

    public static IQueryable<T> isValidAt<T>(IQueryable<T> query, DateTime time) where T : Validity
    {
        return query.Where<T>(c => (c.ValidFrom == null || c.ValidFrom >= time)
            && (c.ValidTo == null || c.ValidTo < time));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
what doesn't work here? –  Grozz Sep 13 '12 at 17:40
    
The where n.isValidAt(t) isn't working... as written above. –  Stefan K. Sep 13 '12 at 17:42
1  
what exactly does "isn't working" mean? exception? doesn't compile? what error? –  Grozz Sep 13 '12 at 17:45
    
Doesn't compile... as I thought I would have written invalid code. But in fact it's valid, as soon as I make isValidAt(...) public! -- Just didn't read the compiler message, because the auto completion didn't even suggest .isValidAt()... –  Stefan K. Sep 13 '12 at 17:48
    
Additional Question: This isn't able use any database index on validFrom/validTo, right? (Whereas a IQueryable-Solution would be). –  Stefan K. Sep 13 '12 at 17:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to declare your bool isValidAt(DateTime time) method as protected so the derived class can access it:

protected bool IsValidAt(DateTime time)

However, after you get this compiling, I doubt that your LINQ to SQL provider will be able to translate the query to SQL. You will probably need to embed the logic inside your LINQ query and write something like:

var items = from n in db.Nodes
            where (n.ValidFrom == null || n.ValidFrom >= t) && (n.ValidTo == null || n.ValidTo < t)
            orderby n.NodeID descending
            select n;

This will work, but a better alternative is to create the following kind of extension method:

public static class ValidityExtensions
{
    public static IQueryable<T> Valid<T>(this IQueryable<T> validities, DateTime time) where T : Validity
    {
        return validities.Where(v => (v.ValidFrom == null || ValidFrom >= time) && (v.ValidTo == null || v.ValidTo < time));
    }
}

Now you can use this as follows:

var items = from n in db.Nodes.Valid(time)
            orderby n.NodeID descending
            select n;
share|improve this answer
1  
That's what I would like to avoid... I mean, to rewrite the SQL-like where-part everywhere. I would like to put it into -one- function that just gives it a name and makes it reusable. –  Stefan K. Sep 13 '12 at 18:01
    
@StefanK. we all would :) Unfortunately that is very difficult to implement in a LINQ provider. See my updated answer for a better alternative. –  Zaid Masud Sep 13 '12 at 18:09
1  
The last solution is what I wanted and did not get working (with IQueryable). But if I put the method into "Validity" you'll need to replace from n in db.Nodes.Valid() by Node.Valid<Node>(db.Nodes, time). –  Stefan K. Sep 14 '12 at 7:51
    
Thanks a lot for your help... –  Stefan K. Sep 14 '12 at 7:51
    
@StefanK. if you put the method in a static class you can use the this keyword –  Zaid Masud May 14 '13 at 13:24

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