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There is one friendly number and N unfriendly numbers. We want to find how many numbers are there which exactly divide the friendly number, but does not divide any of the unfriendly numbers.

Input Format: The first line of input contains two numbers N and K separated by spaces. N is the number of unfriendly numbers, K is the friendly number. The second line of input contains N space separated unfriendly numbers.

Output Format: Output the answer in a single line.

Constraints:

1 <= N <= 10^6

1 <= K <= 10^13

1 <= unfriendly numbers <= 10^18

Sample Input:

8 16

2 5 7 4 3 8 3 18

Sample Output:

1

Explanation : Divisors of the given friendly number 16, are { 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 } and the unfriendly numbers are {2, 5, 7, 4, 3, 8, 3, 18}. Now 1 divides all unfriendly numbers, 2 divide 2, 4 divide 4, 8 divide 8 but 16 divides none of them. So only one number exists which divide the friendly number but does not divide any of the unfriendly numbers. So the answer is 1.

Many people asked this question but no perfect answer has been given. This is not a duplicate as others are closed, I got to ask this question

I've used Sieve of Eratosthenes to refine unfriendly numbers(remove duplicates, remove unnecessary numbers like 2 & 4 in the given example. numbers which divide 2 & 4 also divide 8, so only 8 wud serve the purpose. After doing all these I removed primes)

Here is my code

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class unfriendly {
public static ArrayList<Long> refine_unfriendly(ArrayList<Long> uf){
    int n=uf.size();
    long x;
    for(int i=uf.size()-1;i>=0;i--){
        x=uf.get(i);
        for(int j=uf.size()-1;j>=0;j--){
            if(j==i)
                continue;
            if(j!=i && uf.get(j)%x==0){
                x=uf.get(j);
                uf.remove(i);
                break;
            }
            else if(j!=i && x%uf.get(j)==0){
                uf.remove(j);
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return uf;
}

public static void print_output(long k,ArrayList<Long> uf){
    int n=uf.size(),count=0,i;
    long x,y;
    if(n==0)
        count++;
    for(x=2;x<=Math.sqrt(k);x++){
        if(k%x==0){
            for(i=0;i<n;i++){
                if(uf.get(i)%x==0)
                    break;
            }
            if(i==n)
                count++;
            if(k/x!=x){
                y=k/x;
                for(i=0;i<n;i++){
                    if(uf.get(i)%y==0)
                        break;
                }
                if(i==n)
                    count++;
            }
        }
    }
    for(i=0;i<n;i++){
        if(uf.get(i)%k==0)
            break;
    }
    if(i==n)
        count++;
    System.out.println(count);
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Scanner in=new Scanner(System.in);
    int n=in.nextInt();
    long k=in.nextLong();
    ArrayList<Long> uf=new ArrayList<Long>();
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
        uf.add(in.nextLong());
    uf=refine_unfriendly(uf);
    print_output(k,uf);
}
}

This solves only 1 test case out of 6. Rest are exceeding the time limit. The brute force method (without refining) solved 3 test cases. Someone please help.

Thanks in advance

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My question starts with th actual question. Here'a a link to the question link –  Sai Teja Reddy Sep 13 '12 at 19:29
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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, generate all the factors of K in F. This can be done naively in O(√K) time.

For each unfriendly number Ui, compute gcd(K,Ui) and store it in a set S. This takes O(NlogK) for N bad numbers.

Lastly, we compute the answer by finding the number of factors in F that are factors of no numbers in S. Since both sets contain at most |F| numbers, then this takes O(|F|^2) time.

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I think you answer and Daniel's answer are same complexity wise. Still I tried making changes in the code according to your answer. The same again. 3/6 test cases passed –  Sai Teja Reddy Sep 15 '12 at 1:05
    
I hope you are using appropriate data structures. I used the same algorithm to pass all 6 test cases and used "Sets" which are internally implemented as BSTs –  Sajal Jain Sep 15 '12 at 14:30
    
The same implementation in Java passed 3 testcases and in c it passed only 4 testcases. Others time limit exceeded. I used an array to store gcd's and while calculating factors, I looped through all gcds to check if the factor divides any of the gcds. if yes, I break from the loop going for next factor else i increase the count Btw, which language did you use sajaljain4? –  Sai Teja Reddy Sep 15 '12 at 17:01
2  
@SaiTejaReddy I used C++ STL. I stored the factors in "set" which is a balanced BST, so the factors are always sorted. For each gcd, I calculated the factors and stored them in another "set". Note that a set only keeps unique elements. Finally I used the template set_difference to find the number of unmatched factors which I think uses something similar to merging algorithm as both the data sets are sorted. –  Sajal Jain Sep 15 '12 at 18:51
    
Okay. That was helpful. Thanks :) –  Sai Teja Reddy Sep 15 '12 at 21:12
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Your refining

for(int i=uf.size()-1;i>=0;i--){
    x=uf.get(i);
    for(int j=uf.size()-1;j>=0;j--){

is quadratic in the number N of unfriendly numbers. Since N could be as large as 106, that is a potentially very slow operation.

For small N, checking the entire list of unfriendly numbers is quick anyway, for large N, the refining is prohibitively expensive. Conclusion: Drop the refining, it's a bad idea.

Way faster than checking every number up to sqrt(k) whether it divides k, and if it does, whether it divides any of the unfriendly numbers is to first obtain the list of divisors of k from its prime factorisation (unless k is prime or the product of two close primes, then both ways are about equally fast). If k has many divisors (while the list of divisors to be considered is still large), you can potentially exclude many of them by computing the greatest common divisor g of k and the next unfriendly number, removing all divisors of g from the list. Once the list has become sufficiently short, the simple pairwise check

for u in unfriendlyNumbers
    for d in divisors
        if u%d == 0
            remove d from divisors

becomes the better option.

share|improve this answer
    
k can have a LOT of divisors. I don't think an O(n * num_divs(k)) solution is fast enough. –  IVlad Sep 13 '12 at 20:05
    
It can't have too many divisors, not more than a few thousand. And it's not an O(N * num_divs(k)) algorithm if k has many divisors; while there are many divisors left, the gcd(u,k) is calculated, that's O(log k) at worst. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 13 '12 at 20:17
    
A few thousand is a lot. That is over 10^9 operations in the worst case, and not just any operations but slow ones like modulo. And you still have to iterate the list of divisors to remove those of g, so removing them won't save that much time, if at all. –  IVlad Sep 13 '12 at 20:31
    
You only start dividing by the divisors in the list when that has become short, say shorter than log k or (log k)/2. Removing only requires walking through the list until you reach g (you keep the list sorted, of course). Checking which divisors of k also are divisors of g may be sped up by keeping the factorisations, so you can compare exponents rather than dividing, but maybe not. Anyway, if g is small, there are not many smaller divisors to check, if it's large, many divisors will be removed and not be considered again. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 13 '12 at 20:48
    
How do you know you only start dividing then? Is that an estimate or do you have a good reason for saying that? From your post I understand that you iterate the list starting with the first friendly number. The GCD trick may or may not help, but unless you can show it helps all the time, leading to amortized O(n log k), the algorithm remains O(n * num_divs(k)). Your heuristics are good and your algorithm definitely faster than the OP's, but I have doubts that they will help much in all cases and get AC. Well, hopefully the OP will try it and provide his own feedback. –  IVlad Sep 13 '12 at 21:09
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My code according to Daniel's algorithm

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Solution {
public static long gcd(long a,long b){
    while (b != 0){
        long m = a % b;
        a = b;
        b = m;
    }
    return a;
}
public static ArrayList<Long> get_factors(long k){
    long x;
    ArrayList<Long> factors=new ArrayList<Long>();
    for(x=2;x<=Math.sqrt(k);x++){
        if(k%x==0){
            factors.add(x);
            if(k/x!=x){
                factors.add(k/x);
            }
        }
    }
    factors.add((long)1);
    factors.add(k);
    return factors;
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Scanner in=new Scanner(System.in);
    int n=in.nextInt();
    long k=in.nextLong(),g;
    long[] unf=new long[n];
    ArrayList<Long> factors=new ArrayList<Long>();
    factors=get_factors(k);
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
        unf[i]=in.nextLong();
        g=gcd(k,unf[i]);
        for(int j=factors.size()-1;j>=0;j--){
            if(g%factors.get(j)==0)
                factors.remove(j);
        }
    }
    if(n==0)
        System.out.println(2);
    else
        System.out.println(factors.size());
}
}
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I did the following. But this passes only 2/6 cases. Any idea what is wrong with this code ?

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

set<long> find_factors(long n)
{
    set<long> factors;

    if(n < 2) return factors;

    long s = (long)sqrt(n);
    for(long i=2;i<=s;i++)
    {
        if(n%i==0)
        {
            factors.insert(i);
            factors.insert(n/i);
        }
    }
    factors.insert(n);
    return factors;
}

long find_gcd(long a, long b)
{
        return (b==0)?a:find_gcd(b,a%b);
}

int main()
{
        long N = 0, K = 0;
        cin >> N >> K;

        set<long> factors;
        factors = find_factors(K);

        for(long n=0;n<N;n++)
        {
                long un = 0;
                cin >> un;
                long res = find_gcd(K,un);

                set<long>::iterator itr;
                for ( itr=factors.begin() ; itr != factors.end(); itr++ )
                {
                        if(res % (*itr) == 0)
                        {
                                factors.erase(itr);
                        }
                }
        }

        cout << factors.size() << endl;
}
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You just generate all divisors of K (it takes sqrt(K) time) , and you have create a new unique array of GCD(a[i],K), because if divisor of friendly number divides unfriendly number then it has to divide GCD(unfriendly number,K), so you just use set , because GCD(a[i],K) there are nd(K) number where nd(K) stands for the number of divisors of K . So the algorithm takes just O(nd(K)^2) time .

Here is main body of my code :

for(int i=1;i<=n;i++)
    mm.insert(gcd(a[i],k));

vv=(int)sqrt((double)k);

for(int i=1;i<=vv;i++)
    {
        if(k%i==0)
            {
                zz[++cur]=i;
                zz[++cur]=k/i;
            }
    }
if((ll)vv*(ll)vv==k)
    cur--;
int say=0;
for(int i=1;i<=cur;i++)
    {
        q=0;
        for(it=mm.begin();it!=mm.end();it++)
            if(*it%zz[i]==0)
                {
                    q=1;
                    break;
                }
        if(q==0)
            say++;
    }
cout<<say<<endl;
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You can get all the common divisors between the unfriendly numbers and the friendly number k, using GCD. O(N)

Then get all the divisors of K, O(sqrt(K)).

Then using two inner loops of O(N*sqrt(K)) get the res :). enjoy ;)

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Code which is working but fetched me low score, may be because of more time complexity of findFactorsOfNumber method:

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Set;

public class Solution {

    private Long n, k;
    private static long result = 0;
    private Set<Long> unfriendlyNumbers;

    private Solution() {
        this.unfriendlyNumbers = new HashSet<Long>();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Solution solution = new Solution();
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        solution.n = scanner.nextLong();
        solution.k = scanner.nextLong();
        for (long l = 0; l < solution.n; l++) {
            solution.unfriendlyNumbers.add(scanner.nextLong());
        }

        Set<Long> factors = findFactorsOfNumber(solution.k);

        // find gcd of k and each of n unfriendly numbers
        Set<Long> gcdSet = new HashSet<Long>();
        for (long unfriendlyNumber : solution.unfriendlyNumbers) {
            gcdSet.add(gcd(solution.k, unfriendlyNumber));
        }

        // check for those factors which are not the factors for any number in gcdSet
        result = factors.size();
        for (Long factor : factors) {
            for (long gcd : gcdSet) {
                if ((gcd >= factor && gcd % factor == 0)) {
                    result--;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println(result);

    }

    private static Set<Long> findFactorsOfNumber(Long input) {
        long increment = 1;
        if (input % 2 != 0) {
            increment = 2;
        }
        Set<Long> list = new HashSet<Long>();
        for (long i = 1; i <= input / 2; i = i + increment) {
            if (input % i == 0) {
                list.add(i);
            }
        }
        list.add(input);
        return list;
    }

    public static long gcd(long p, long q) {
        if (q == 0) {
            return p;
        }
        return gcd(q, p % q);
    }

}
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