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I'm new to web development (though not new to WinForms developmet) and I wanted to know the correct and efficient way to handle errors both on the client side as well as the server side.

For example, user enters a bad zip code (using letters), I want to notify the user of the bad zip code entered, how do I handle this?

I'm assuming this would be on the client side but can anyone show me an example code? What scripting language should you use? Should you display a message on the screen? Should you make an error message visible? What is the standard way of doing this?

Example two: user clicks on something that runs a query in a server database. An error occurs. How do I notify the user of the error?

Usually in Win Forms I can just do this:

try
{
     CreateDirectoriesAndSystemFiles();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
     ErrorLogger.LogError(ex.Source, ex.TargetSite.ToString(), "Error creating directories!; " + ex.Message);
     MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error creating directories!", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
     return;
}

How can I mimic the above in a web environment?

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1  
I hope you only have such exception "handling" code in your top-level event handling code. If you've got that sort of thing in every method, then do your self a favor and don't duplicate that in the web world (or any other). –  John Saunders Sep 13 '12 at 19:31
    
What's wrong with me doing a try/catch for methods that could raise an exception? –  Testifier Sep 13 '12 at 19:37
    
If you're looking explicitly for logging of errors (rather than validation) consider elmah/log4net but theyre mainly for server side errors - theoretically though you could create an ajax based client side mechanism to push errors to a logging age and record them on the server there. –  bUKaneer Sep 13 '12 at 19:39
    
Totally the wrong way to handle exceptions, and the exact opposite of what you want to do. Especially since just logging and ignoring the exception does not constitute "handling" it. See stackoverflow.com/tags/exception-handling/info. –  John Saunders Sep 13 '12 at 19:39
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1 For client notification, you can use Validators

Link : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.ui.webcontrols.requiredfieldvalidator.aspx

This link is about RequiredFieldValidator

You have also CompareValidator, CustomValidator etc ....

Link : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972961.aspx

That's good solution.

2 For treatment exception, you can use Global.asax and Applicatio_Error

Link : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/24395wz3%28v=vs.100%29.aspx

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Most people use jQuery validate as its very easy to use whilst being extremely powerful and flexible. Docs are here http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Validation . Microsoft include them by default in MVC 3 & 4 and use it for model validation client side so if you're using MS stack and MVC thats another good reason to use it. Things get a bit different in Web Forms as you tend to use the built in validation controls which handle both client and server side out of the box references here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a0z2h4sw(v=vs.100).aspx - these are exnsible through the Custom Validator types that allow you to specify server and client side methods that you write yourself to handle bespoke functionality. Hope this helps!

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+1 for the CustomValidator. I use that to bind both client and server-side validation in forms-based asp.net. I find it helps making further maintenance easier by providing a single point of integration in the markup. –  Cypher Sep 13 '12 at 19:39
    
Yeah Custom Validators have got me out of a few really sticky spots before. My only issue with the Forms Validators in general though is the limitation of presenting them - jQuery Validate allows you to be "pretty" with the errors ;o) –  bUKaneer Sep 13 '12 at 19:42
    
I've had no such limitations and have been able to display errors in many ways, from tooltips to dialog boxes. Of course, I was using jQuery to manipulate the client-side validation to do those things, but just wanted it to be known that it's certainly possible. It may even be possible to combine the two: jQuery validators used for client-side validation bound to a CustomValidator. Never tried, though. –  Cypher Sep 13 '12 at 19:47
    
Really?! Hmmm that sounds like the start of a great blog post "How to Make ASP.NET Web Forms Validation Controls Pretty" & "How to Merge jQuery Validation with Validators" - I wonder if you could use custom validators to wire up jQuery validation? –  bUKaneer Sep 13 '12 at 19:52
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asp.net can do the same try/catch handling for server-side errors.

as far as input validation goes, you should look into Asp.net Input Validation Controls

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For example #2 you can redirect to error page

try
{
     CreateDirectoriesAndSystemFiles();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
     Response.Redirect("Error.aspx?err=" + ex.GetType());
}

and on the Error.aspx page just parse err parameter and show it to user.

Good idea is to log this in db (if you use it).

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1  
ASP.NET will do that for you. Just configure <customErrors> –  John Saunders Sep 13 '12 at 19:39
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Depends on if you are using webforms or MVC.

In MVC, generally for server side error handling I create an ApplicationController class that inherits and put my error handling, logging and redirect logic there then have my controllers inherit this class.

For webforms I would create an error control and include this in my master page and feed the server side errors back to this.

In either case, for client side you can use jquery and javascript for field validations.

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you're asking a lot of questions, i'll try and answer a few:

  1. concerning validation (the zipcode example)- firstly, and I cannot stress this enough- allways validate things on the server side client-side code, such as javascript, can be easily turned off / circumvented. Even if you check things on the client side (and you should)- always check them on the server side as well.
    That said, what validation framework to use depends on what display framework you're using. I've used jquery's validation in the past, and was pleased with it.

  2. What scripting language should you use? well, if there was one correct answer to that one, then there wouldn't be much point in having so many, right :)
    Anyway, jQuery is very popular, but so is knockoutJS, and I hear angular is gaining in popularity. just see which one you like

  3. for unexpected errors on the server-side, there had been some good suggestions. I like Aghilas Yakoub's.

Best of luck

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