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I may asking a stupid question, but I really can't find an answer with google plus I am still a beginner of using MSVS.

I recently need to use functions to make comparison of two strings. What I don't understand is the difference of stricmp and _stricmp. They both can be used to compare strings and return the same results. I went to check them:

char string1[] = "The quick brown dog jumps over the lazy fox";
char string2[] = "The QUICK brown dog jumps over the lazy fox";

void main( void )
{
   char tmp[20];
   int result;
   /* Case sensitive */
   printf( "Compare strings:\n\t%s\n\t%s\n\n", string1, string2 );
   result = stricmp( string1, string2 );
   if( result > 0 )
      strcpy( tmp, "greater than" );
   else if( result < 0 )
      strcpy( tmp, "less than" );
   else
      strcpy( tmp, "equal to" );
   printf( "\tstricmp:   String 1 is %s string 2\n", tmp );
   /* Case insensitive */
   result = _stricmp( string1, string2 );
   if( result > 0 )
      strcpy( tmp, "greater than" );
   else if( result < 0 )
      strcpy( tmp, "less than" );
   else
      strcpy( tmp, "equal to" );
   printf( "\t_stricmp:  String 1 is %s string 2\n", tmp );
}

result shows they are the same:

Compare strings:
    The quick brown dog jumps over the lazy fox
    The QUICK brown dog jumps over the lazy fox

    stricmp:   String 1 is equal to string 2
    _stricmp:  String 1 is equal to string 2

I am wondering why...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

stricmp is a POSIX function, and not a standard C90 function. To avoid name clashes Microsoft deprecated the non-conforming name (stricmp) and recommends using _stricmp instead. There is no difference in functionality (stricmp is merely an alias for _stricmp.)

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2  
The leading underscore indicates that it's a vendor specific symbol that shouldn't conflict with any user symbols or future standards. –  Mark Ransom Sep 13 '12 at 21:35
    
Thanks StarPilot. I'll use _stricmp in my project. And other functions works in the same way? –  FortCpp Sep 13 '12 at 22:06
2  
stricmp is not a POSIX function, it's a Win32 function. POSIX defines strcasecmp instead. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 7 '13 at 8:56
    
Microsoft states they are POSIX functions in their documentation. For instance, see: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms235365(v=vs.80).aspx –  StarPilot Aug 7 '13 at 15:26
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For many library functions, including all the <string.h> functions, the underscore prefixed versions are/were Microsoft's idea of something. I don't recall exactly what.

The non-underscored version is highly portable. Code which uses _stricmp(), _strcpy(), etc. must be handled somehow—edit, #defined, etc.—if the code will be processed by another compiler.

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However, neither stricmp nor _stricmp is part of standard C nor C++; technically, stricmp not one of the <string.h> functions. But it's a very common extension. –  Pete Becker Sep 13 '12 at 20:42
    
@PeteBecker: Yes, though some libraries have strcmpi() or strcasecmp() instead. –  wallyk Sep 13 '12 at 20:49
    
Thanks your answer wallyk. I think maybe it is very helpful to make the code portable by using 'stricmp' (not _stricmp). Since I was looking for the replacement of function strcasecmp() and strncasecmp(). My understanding so far, is that one can use (_)stricmp and (_)strnicmp as replacements. –  FortCpp Sep 13 '12 at 22:13
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