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I am using a viewmodel with required field validation specified for some properties. I was able to create readonly version of same model using "displayfor". In a page, along with this readonly view there are other controls too along with submit. Now, when I click on "submit", it is getting validated and ModelState is invalid. How to remove validation, if we use model only for display.

ViewModel

public class CustomerVM
{
 [Required]
 public string Name {get;set;}
}

View

@using (Html.BeginForm("CreateCustomer, "Customer", FormMethod.Post))
{   
 @Html.DisplayFor(o => o.Name)

 @..other input controls.@

 <input id="btnSave" type="submit" value="Save" />
}

Model.State is invalid since name is rendered as label and httppost doesn't have that value.

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Hard to answer without your view's code and model... –  Raphaël Althaus Sep 13 '12 at 19:49
    
Is setting CausesValidation="False" on your button an option? Not sure of your setup. (Ref: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  bygrace Sep 13 '12 at 19:50
    
@bygrace if OP is accepting any user input in the 'other controls' mentioned, the site is then open to XSS with CausesValidation="False" –  Forty-Two Sep 13 '12 at 19:58
    
edited my answer based on your code –  Forty-Two Sep 13 '12 at 20:08
    
Why downvote the question? It would be beneficial if downvoters explain their downvote. –  bygrace Sep 14 '12 at 20:12
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3 Answers

You could use a different view model with different validation requirements for this 'read only' view. Or you could use the ModelState.Remove() method in your controller to get rid of errors against properties that you don't want validated. IMO the separate view model approach is better.

edit after seeing your code

Add a hiddenfor

@Html.DisplayFor(o => o.Name)
@Html.HiddenFor(o => o.Name)

That will pass the data back to the controller on the post and result in ModelState.IsValid == true

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Can't they firebug and edit your hidden value? Guess the security depends on how the serverside code is handled. –  bygrace Sep 13 '12 at 20:15
    
@bygrace HiddenFor values are still subject to dataAnnotations validation checks (which is server side validation). I'm not saying it's 100% safe, just that it is not bypassing server side validation checks. –  Forty-Two Sep 14 '12 at 12:16
    
Yeah, I'm just saying that he should be careful to not update his model based on the value that is posed back from the field. It would be easy to be lazy and map the whole view model back depending on his setup. If he did then someone could edit the hidden value and he would save that value to the db. Of course he shouldn't do it if there was no hidden field too :) Only reason I bring it up is that I have seen peopled do that before. I think it is better not to put form data on the page if you aren't going to use it. –  bygrace Sep 14 '12 at 12:29
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This is where MetadataTypeAttribute comes in handy:

public class MyModel
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IMyModelValidation
{
  [Required]
  public string Name { get; set; }
}

[MetadataType(typeof(IMyModelValiation))]
public class MyModelValidation : MyModel { }

Now MyModel has no validation and MyModelValidation does have validation, and they can be used almost interchangeably.

  • MetadataType

The MetadataTypeAttribute attribute enables you to associate a class with a data-model partial class. In this associated class you provide additional metadata information that is not in the data model.

For example, in the associated class you can apply the RequiredAttribute attribute to a data field. This enforces that a value is provided for the field even if this constraint is not required by the database schema.

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I'm not saying this is the best approach but I had to do something similar so I setup validation groups. I created an attribute that I placed on each model property that defined its validation group. Then on postback I called an extension method on the ViewDataDictionary and passed in the validation group that I wanted to run validation on. This would remove any validation messages for all other groups. Here is some example code:

The attribute:

/// <summary>
/// Attribute that assigns the property on a model to a given
/// validation group. By using the ValidationGroupExtension 
/// and calling ValidateGroup on the ViewData validation errors
/// for properties that are not included in the validation group 
/// will be removed.
/// </summary>
public class ValidationGroup : Attribute
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The unique name of the group.
    /// </summary>
    public String Group { get; set; }

    public ValidationGroup(String group)
    {
        this.Group = group;
    }
}

The extension:

/// <summary>
/// Used in conjunction with the ValidationGroup attribute to 
/// specify which fields in a model should be validated. The 
/// ValidateGroup extension should be called on ViewData before 
/// checking whether the model is valid or not.
/// </summary>
public static class ValidationGroupExtension
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Remove all validation errors that are assocaited with 
    /// properties that do not have the ValidationGroup attribute
    /// set with the specified group name.
    /// 
    /// This only handles flat models.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="viewData">View Data</param>
    /// <param name="model">Data model returned</param>
    /// <param name="group">Name of the validation group</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static ViewDataDictionary ValidateGroup(this ViewDataDictionary viewData, Object model, String group)
    {
        //get all properties that have the validation group attribut set for the given group
        var properties = model.GetType().GetProperties()
            .Where(x => x.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ValidationGroup), false)
                            .Where(a => ((ValidationGroup)a).Group == group).Count() > 0)
                            .Select(x => x.Name);

        //find all properties that don't match these properties
        var matchingProperties = viewData.ModelState.Where(x => !properties.Contains(x.Key)).ToList();

        //remove any property that isn't in the gorup
        foreach (var matchingProperty in matchingProperties)
        {
            viewData.ModelState.Remove(matchingProperty.Key);
        }

        return viewData;
    }
}

On PostBack:

ViewData.ValidateGroup(model, "my validation group name");
if (ModelState.IsValid)
{
    ...
}

On the ViewModel:

[Required]
[DisplayName("Name")]
[ValidationGroup("my validation group name")]
public string Name { get; set; }
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If you vote down it is nice to add a comment :) –  bygrace Sep 13 '12 at 20:20
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