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I'm having trouble crafting a query to return the correct data, and I'm becoming less confident that it's even possible with a single query.

I have log records stored in a MySQL database in very much in the same way that printf() works, except that I must keep the format strings stored separately from the replacement values. What I'd like to do is return this data in the most efficient manner possible, given a search for certain values.

Here's the table setup:

CREATE TABLE `log` (
  `log_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `message` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `num_variables` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `created` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`log_id`)
);

CREATE TABLE `variable` (
  `log_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `order` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `value_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  KEY `log_id` (`log_id`),
  KEY `value_id` (`value_id`)
);

CREATE TABLE `value` (
  `value_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `value` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `created` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`value_id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `value` (`value`)
);

And here's an example usage:

log('user %email% invited %num% new players', 'him@example.com', 2);

which would lead to the following queries:

-- create the log record (resulting PK would be 1)
INSERT INTO log
(message, num_variables)
VALUES
('user %email% invited %num% new players', 'him@example.com', '2');

-- create the first value record (resulting PK would be 1)
INSERT INTO value
(value)
VALUES
('him@example.com');

-- create the first variable record (resulting PK would be 1)
INSERT INTO variable
(log_id, order, name, value_id)
VALUES
(1, 0, 'email', 1);

-- create the second value record (resulting PK would be 2)
INSERT INTO value
(value)
VALUES
('2');

-- create the second variable record (resulting PK would be 2)
INSERT INTO variable
(log_id, order, name, value_id)
VALUES
(1, 1, 'num', 2);

Now I want to be able to pull log records back out of the database, with their associated variables and values. Specifically, I need the log message, and all it's associated values:

SELECT  log.id, log.message
        variable.order, variable.name
        value.value_id, value.value
FROM log
LEFT JOIN variable ON (log.log_id = variable.log_id)
LEFT JOIN value ON (variable.value_id = value.value_id)

This works fine if I want ALL log records (ignoring the fact that log.log_id and log.message are returned redundantly for any logs with multiple variables). But I want more specificity.

To borrow from the example above, I want to be able to specify that I only want log records containing an "email" of "him@example.com", let's say. When I add that into my query...

SELECT  log.log_id, log.message
        variable.order, variable.name
        value.value_id, value.value
FROM log
LEFT JOIN variable ON (log.log_id = variable.log_id)
LEFT JOIN value ON (variable.value_id = value.value_id)
WHERE (variable.name = 'email' AND value.value = 'him@example.com')

It will return that log/variable/value record, but it will NOT return the associated "num = 2" record (which is required to fully reconstruct the log). Additionally, suppose I wanted to specify a second constraint, say, where "action" = "logged out". I could (incorrectly) alter my WHERE clause to look like this:

-- won't return anything
WHERE (variable.name = 'email' AND value.value = 'him@example.com')
AND (variable.name = 'action' AND value.value = 'logged out')

or this:

-- will also return logs containing only ONE of the given constraints
WHERE (variable.name = 'email' AND value.value = 'him@example.com')
OR (variable.name = 'action' AND value.value = 'logged out')

but in either case, you can see that it misses the mark, and doesn't return the exact result set I'm looking for.

Are my tables are poorly (or under- or over-) designed? Am I approaching the query the wrong way? Would storing a field of derived data somewhere give me what I need? Is there some JOIN I've failed to use that would solve the problem?

UPDATE 1:

variable.order and variable.name are just two different methods for assuring that the values are interpolated back into log.message correctly.

UPDATE 2:

Based on comments, it's worth noting that these tables are a contrived example to simplify the post - the actual table structure is slightly more complex than presented. I've merely reduced that complexity down to the very kernel of the issue. Simple use-a-single-table-and-serialize-the-value techniques won't work for me. Aside from that, we need to be able to lookup these logs based on values pretty quickly, and such a solution wouldn't provide us the proper indexing capabilities.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use just one table for your logs? log_id | message | num_variables | created | order | values I don't see any relation between tables. In values field you can put serialized array of values. –  Alexander Larikov Sep 13 '12 at 20:08
    
you know. use sqlfiddle.com for online database schema and you can run your queries. its awesome.. no need to write all those above queries –  Rafee Sep 13 '12 at 20:09
    
Do you really need to store the values separately - to query on them in some way other than concat'ing them back with the message? If not, put them all on one comma-separated string and move on... –  Alain Collins Sep 13 '12 at 20:10
    
@AlexanderLarikov I'd actually started out like that, but we aren't able to pull any fancy serialization tricks here 1) because then we can't index unique values, thus searches on specific values result in full table scans and 2) this has to be accessed across different platforms, so we'd have to put too much effort into the serialization format. –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 20:11
    
@AlainCollins See my note to AlexanderLarkov above. Perhaps it's worth noting that this as a contrived example - the "values" table is a bit more complex (i.e. not just a varchar field). –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about:

...
WHERE log.id IN (SELECT l.id 
                 FROM log l 
                 INNER JOIN variable v ON l.log_id = v.log_id
                 INNER JOIN value vv ON v.value_id = vv.value_id
                 WHERE v.name = 'email' and vv.value = 'him@example.com')

Without knowing a bigger sample of data, I can't really comment on the table design. At this point I do question separating out the variables and values tables unless this is a one-to-many relationship variables->values.

share|improve this answer
    
To your question about separating out the variables and values: I actually only store unique values in the value table to save space. variables:values is actually a many:one (not one:many as you'd guessed). –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 20:22
    
How would you incorporate 2 values, though? Would you simply append an AND log.log_id IN (...? Or would you make the existing inner-WHERE more complex? –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 20:25
    
@Chris Fair enough. And yes, to incorporate 2 values, you would append an OR log.log_id IN (... or AND if that's what you need. Probably not the most efficient though but it's the best I can come up with now. –  lc. Sep 13 '12 at 20:28
    
And we have a winner! Thank you so much, Ic. - exactly what I needed. –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 21:11

Well you can come up with following structure

CREATE TABLE `logs` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `message` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `num_variables` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `created` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
);

CREATE TABLE `logs_values` (
  `log_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `value_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE `value` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `value` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `created` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `value` (`value`)
);

CREATE TABLE `names`(
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
);

To get all log records run this query

SELECT * FROM logs
LEFT JOIN logs_values ON logs_values.log_id = logs.id
LEFT JOIN value ON logs_values.value_id = value.id
LEFT JOIN names ON value.name_id = names.id;

To get all log records with specified value

SELECT * FROM logs
LEFT JOIN logs_values ON logs_values.log_id = logs.id
LEFT JOIN value ON logs_values.value_id = value.id
LEFT JOIN names ON value.name_id = names.id
WHERE names.name = 'email' AND value.value = 'email@email.com';

Result

ID  MESSAGE NUM_VARIABLES   CREATED                           VALUE                 NAME
1   test       2            September, 13 2012 16:24:31-0400  email@email.com   email

SQL Fiddle

P.S. Of course you need to set up required indexes for better performance

share|improve this answer
    
At its core, this solution has log records, value records, and a many-many linker table. In that light, it doesn't look fundamentally different than my current design (replace the function of your logs_values table with my variable table and you've got the same basic structure)... or is there something I missed? –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 20:40
    
@Chris in my example i set up relations between tables, see these log_id, value_id, name_id. Based on this fields you can get what you need. –  Alexander Larikov Sep 13 '12 at 20:43
    
Forgive my persistence, but in my post, it looks like I have the same exact relationships (but I call it variable instead of logs_values). –  Chris Sep 13 '12 at 20:46
    
@Chris no worries, main thing is the table logs_values which define many-to-many relationship between logs and value tables. EDIT sorry, i just realized you have same structure for this table. –  Alexander Larikov Sep 13 '12 at 20:48

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