Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have searched around the web for an answer to this question to no avail... I have an application that creates Scheduled Tasks via the C++ ITask Interface ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa381311(v=vs.85).aspx ).

It works correctly but I recently added the SetParameters function to handle an instance of scheduling a perl script to run. For instance, the command is:
C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe C:\Compare.pl -I C:\input.txt

I was initially able to make this as part of the task to run. However, it failed due to appending some extra quotation marks on the command. So I would get:
"C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe C:\Compare.pl -I C:\input.txt"

in the run section of the scheduled task properties. Since there are tons of these servers, manually removing it is out of the question.

This could easily be fixed by creating a batch script and scheduling it (which we are currently doing). However, I want to fix it right. Thus, my use of the SetParameters command.

My Question: Is SetParameters supported in Windows XP/Server 2003? and if so, how can I verify that they have been set? I have looked in the scheduled task properties section and even tried schtasks /Query /FO LIST /V and I still don't see the parameters. All I get is the task to run property to be C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe Also, NOTE I am aware of the support for Windows server 2008 and Windows 7.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out this was a bug in my application. I can confirm that parameters are viewable in Windows XP. They show up like this:

C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe C:\Compare.pl -I C:\input.txt

In the task text box when you view properties.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.