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I store the values from some analog registers (0 and 1) to the database and I would like to do the following:

I have the following table in the database for storing the sensors values:

ID   |          TIMESTAMP     |  ALIAS  |  STATUS
 1   |    2012-09-12 12:31:01 |   AR1   |     0
 2   |    2012-09-12 12:31:02 |   AR1   |     0
 3   |    2012-09-12 12:31:03 |   AR1   |     0
 4   |    2012-09-12 12:31:04 |   AR1   |     0
 5   |    2012-09-12 12:31:05 |   AR1   |     0
 6   |    2012-09-12 12:31:06 |   AR1   |     0
 7   |    2012-09-12 12:31:07 |   AR1   |     1
 8   |    2012-09-12 12:31:08 |   AR1   |     1
 9   |    2012-09-12 12:31:09 |   AR1   |     1
10   |    2012-09-12 12:31:10 |   AR1   |     0
11   |    2012-09-12 12:31:11 |   AR1   |     0
12   |    2012-09-12 12:31:12 |   AR1   |     0
13   |    2012-09-12 12:31:13 |   AR1   |     0
14   |    2012-09-12 12:31:14 |   AR1   |     0
15   |    2012-09-12 12:31:15 |   AR1   |     1
16   |    2012-09-12 12:31:16 |   AR1   |     0
17   |    2012-09-12 12:31:17 |   AR1   |     0
18   |    2012-09-12 12:31:01 |   AR1   |     0
 ...

Using an SQL query, I would like to be able to return when the register had changed status in order to create a graph without using unnecessary points. Keep in mind that the table consists of 1 million and more values and by doing this I will reduce the size of the returned data and the graph will be faster.

I am not sure if MySQL provides a functionality as described but at first I thought that GROUP BY might have been a good solution but unfortunately it is not.

Any suggestions?

Desired output:

ID   |          TIMESTAMP     |  ALIAS  |  STATUS
 1   |    2012-09-12 12:31:01 |   AR1   |     0
 6   |    2012-09-12 12:31:06 |   AR1   |     0
 7   |    2012-09-12 12:31:07 |   AR1   |     1
 9   |    2012-09-12 12:31:09 |   AR1   |     1
10   |    2012-09-12 12:31:10 |   AR1   |     0
14   |    2012-09-12 12:31:14 |   AR1   |     0
15   |    2012-09-12 12:31:15 |   AR1   |     1
16   |    2012-09-12 12:31:16 |   AR1   |     0
 ...

You can observe that I am removing intermediate lines between sequential values as I only need the first and last occurrence of a value and the new value.

Any suggestions?

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2  
Those look like digital values. –  Chris Laplante Sep 13 '12 at 21:30
    
Yes you are correct –  salamis Sep 14 '12 at 6:58
    
But binary doesn't imply digital. Stare at your light switch for a while... –  Alain Collins Sep 14 '12 at 15:35
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd do it with variables. Unfortunately, I can't write it out for you know, but please see a similar response of mine over here:

get consecutive records in mysql

I'll try to check back on it tomorrow.

Today's answer:

Can you live with just the rows where status changes (rather than also including the row before)? This will get you the duration, with the assumption that all data samples were recorded...

If so, this works:

set @last_status = null;
select  id, timestamp, alias, status,
  case when @last_status is null or status != @last_status then 1 else  0 end as changed, 
@last_status := status
from sensor_values
having changed = 1;

If not, I'll hack on it some more after my morning interview :)

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