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This is what I have done so far to resolve the return 1;, return 0;, it is actually a sudoku solver using backtracking algorithm, so I am trying to parallelize it, but I cant get the complete result. (correct me if my implementation is wrong) what actually happen? anybody can help?!

this is the site i refer to, i used to follow their way : http://www.thinkingparallel.com/2007/06/29/breaking-out-of-loops-in-openmp/#reply

int solver (int row, int col)
{
   int i;
   boolean flag = FALSE;
   if (outBoard[row][col] == 0)
   {
      #pragma omp parallel num_threads(2)
      #pragma omp parallel for //it works if i remove this line
      for (i = 1; i < 10; i++)
      {
         if (checkExist(row, col, i)) //if not, assign number i to the empty cell
            outBoard[row][col] = i;

         #pragma omp flush (flag)
         if (!flag)
         {
            if (row == 8 && col == 8)
            {
               //return 1;
               flag = TRUE;
               #pragma omp flush (flag)
            }
            else if (row == 8)
            {
               if (solver(0, col+1))
               {
                  //return 1;
                  flag = TRUE;
                  #pragma omp flush (flag)
               }
            }
            else if (solver(row+1, col))
            {
               //return 1;
               flag = TRUE;
               #pragma omp flush (flag)
            }
         }
      }


         if (flag) { return 1; }

         if (i == 10) 
         { 
            if (outBoard[row][col] !=  inBoardA[row][col]) 
            outBoard[row][col] = 0;
        return 0; 
          } 

     } 
     else 
      { 
        if (row == 8 && col == 8) 
         { 
        return 1; 
          } 
         else if (row == 8) 
         {    
            if (solver(0,col+1)) return 1; 
          } 
          else 
          { 
            if (solver(row+1,col)) return 1; 
           } 

     return 0;
    }
}

5 0 0 0 0 3 7 0 0
7 4 6 1 0 2 3 0 0
0 3 8 0 9 7 5 0 2
9 7 0 4 0 0 2 0 0
0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0
0 0 4 0 0 5 0 1 9
4 0 3 2 7 0 9 8 0
0 0 5 3 0 9 6 7 4
0 0 7 5 0 0 0 0 3
Sudoku solved :
5 2 9 8 0 3 7 4 1
7 4 6 1 5 2 3 9 0
1 3 8 0 9 7 5 6 2
9 7 0 4 1 0 2 3 6
0 1 2 9 6 0 4 5 8
3 6 4 7 8 5 0 1 9
4 0 3 2 7 6 9 8 5
2 8 5 3 0 9 6 7 4
6 9 7 5 4 8 1 2 3

The //return 1; is the original serial code, since return is not allowed in the parallel for, so I used #pragma opm flush to eliminate it, but the result is not complete, it still left few empty grids in the sudoku.

Thanks for answering :>

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"i hope my code doesnt mess you up" No it doesn't, but your spelling and grammar is terrible. Please at least try clean it up a bit so it's readable. –  Tony The Lion Sep 13 '12 at 22:00
    
@Tony, forgive me for my poor english, i will improve it.I am happy if you could answer my question? –  CT5275 Sep 13 '12 at 22:19
    
I don't have any experience with openmp, so can't help you. Sorry :( –  Tony The Lion Sep 13 '12 at 22:20
    
ok, is alright :) –  CT5275 Sep 13 '12 at 22:22
1  
Branching in a loop the way it is done in the article you refer to is a terrible idea. OpenMP is not designed for that. OpenMP is a data-parallel paradigm and should only be used for simple data-parallel algorithms. For anything more complicated there are other paradigms to be employed. –  Hristo Iliev Sep 14 '12 at 9:16

1 Answer 1

First, since solver is called recursively, it doubles the number of threads with each level of recursion. I don't think it's what you intended to do. Edit: This is only true if nested parallelism is enabled with omp_set_nested(), and by default it is not. So only the first call of solver will fork.

#pragma omp parallel num_threads(2)
#pragma omp parallel for

in your code tries to create one parallel region within another, and it will cause the loop that follows to execute twice, because outer parallel already created two threads. This should be replaced with

#pragma omp parallel num_threads(2)
#pragma omp for

or equivalent #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(2).

Second, this code:

if (checkExist(row,col,i))//if not, assign number i to the empty cell
    outBoard[row][col] = i; 

creates a race condition, with both threads writing different values to the same cell in parallel. You might want to create a separate copy of the board for each thread to work with.

Another code part,

if (outBoard[row][col] != inBoardA[row][col]) 
    outBoard[row][col] = 0;

seems to be outside the parallel region, but in nested calls to solver it's also executed in parallel in different threads created by the outer-most solver.

Final(e) (18.09) Anyway, even if you manage to debug/change your code to run correctly in parallel (as I myself did just for the heck of it - i'll try to provide the code if anyone is interested, which I doubt), the outcome will be that parallel execution of this code doesn't give you much advantage. The reason to my mind is as follows:

Imagine when solver iterates over 9 possible cell values it creates 9 branches of execution. If you create 2 threads using OpenMP, it will distribute top-level branches between threads in some way, say 5 branches executed by one thread and 4 by another, and in each thread branches will be executed consecutively, one by one. If initial sudoku state is valid, only one branch will lead to correct solution. Other branches will be cut short when they'll encounter discrepancy in the solution, so some will take longer and some will take shorter time to run, while the branch leading to correct solution will run the longest. You cannot predict what branches will take what time to execute, so there is no way to reasonably balance the workload among the threads. Even if you use OpenMP dynamic scheduling, chances are that while one thread executes the longest branch, other thread(s) will already finish all other branches and will wait for the last branch, because there are too little branches (so dynamic scheduling will be of little help).

Since creating threads and synchronizing data between them incurs some substantial overhead (compared to sequential solver running time of 0.01-10 ms), you'll see parallel execution time somewhat longer or shorter than sequential, depending on an input.

In any case, if the sequential solver running time is under 10 ms, why do you want to make it parallel?

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1  
Recursive threads doubling will only happen if he explicitly enables nested parallelism as it is disabled by default. –  Hristo Iliev Sep 14 '12 at 10:38
    
yes, the function is not complete, there are still several lines after the if(flags) function –  CT5275 Sep 14 '12 at 11:06
    
I guess, there you clear the cell if the solution was not found, thus creating more confusion. So one thread might clear the cell, while another still thinks it works with its own version of the board. –  Victor K Sep 14 '12 at 11:14
    
Also, did you try testing this version with num_threads(1)? After you set flag=TRUE, you don't exit loop immediately, but continue to execute if (checkExist(row, col, i)) outBoard[row][col] = i; –  Victor K Sep 14 '12 at 11:26
    
@VictorKuznetsov, Yes, it works with num_threads(1) ,i also eliminated the #pragma omp parallel for as what Histro said, the duration is double of the num_threads(2) as usual =)...so it means my program is OK now!? i am quite sad of my coding skill now. –  CT5275 Sep 14 '12 at 11:47

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