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Edit : If you're seeing this same problem (and you're accustomed to NOT seeing this under VS2010) please comment below so I know it's not just me - but be sure to check Han's answer to make sure none of those scenarios appear...


I've been updating my app to run with .NET 4.5 in VS2012 RTM and noticing something that I don't quite understand and that is unexpectedly green highlighted statements (instead of yellow).

enter image description here

Now I'm well aware of what this is supposed to mean, and the IDE is even showing me a little explanation tooltip.

This is the next statement to execute when this thread returns from the current function

However there's absolutely nothing asynchronous or thread based about this code. In this simple example I'm sure you'll agree that string.ToUpper() won't be off in another thread. I can step through the code no issue.

There's nothing else going on and I am on the main thread as you can see here.

s

I am using async and await and MVVM-Light (the above method is the result of a RelayCommand) but I still get this behavior even when the code path is directly off an event handler such as PreviewKeyDown.

enter image description here

If I create a new app I cannot duplicate this - the coloring is yellow as expected - even when using await.

Anybody got any idea? It's starting to drive me crazy!!

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attn upvoters: are you getting this problem too - or just curious? –  Simon_Weaver Sep 13 '12 at 23:18
    
What does the callstack window show at that time? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 14 '12 at 7:44
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever hmm - that's wierd. now it's back to being yellow as it should be. but it's been doing this for days so I'll report back when it happens again. I fear this is an obscure VS2012 bug. it doesn't immediately seem to be dependent upon async, hosting process enabled or edit & continue enabled –  Simon_Weaver Sep 14 '12 at 8:46
    
after I installed VS2012 debugging doesn't break all processes stackoverflow.com/questions/12819002/… –  Omu Oct 10 '12 at 12:31

1 Answer 1

It is green when the current instruction pointer is not exactly at the start of the statement. Some common causes:

  • Very common with threading, setting a breakpoint in one thread and switching context to another. The other thread will have been interrupted by the debugger at an entirely random location. Often in code that you don't have source code or debugging info for, like String.ToUpper()
  • Using Debugger + Break All to break into the debugger. Same idea as above, the instruction pointer will be at a random address
  • Getting an exception in code you don't have debugging info for. The editor shows the last entry in the Call Stack that it does have source code for. You need the call stack window to see where the actual exception was raised. Or the Exception Assistant, its reason for being
  • Debugging optimized code. The jitter optimizer scrambles the code pretty heavily, making it likely that the debugger can't show the current location accurately
  • Having out-dated debugging info or editing the code while debugging.

That last one sounds like a good explanation for your particular scenario. Tools + Options, Debugging, General. Ensure that the "Require source files to exactly match the original version" option is ticked.

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thanks for all the info. I'm pretty sure there's some sort of bug because none of these seem to apply. I'm definitely on the correct statement - it is just erroneously telling me it is waiting for something to return - which it isn't :-/ –  Simon_Weaver Sep 17 '12 at 2:27

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