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Say I have a file which contains a few entries like this:

02/10/11 10:26:35 AM UTC, 0
02/10/11 10:26:38 AM UTC, 1
02/10/11 10:26:42 AM UTC, 0

Is there any straightforward way, in R, to turn this information into a full-length binary timeseries (assuming a one second sampling interval), imputed with zeros and ones?

In this example the series would be: 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0

EDIT: Because Dirk and Josh gave unique solutions I wanted to see how they compare in terms of processing time:

library(xts)
library(data.table)
library(rbenchmark)

doseq <- function(N,Nby){
  base.t <<- Sys.time()
  t.seq <<- base.t + seq.int(from=0, to=N, by=Nby)
  n.t <<- length(t.seq)
  val.seq <<- (1:n.t - 1) %% 2
}

josh <- function(N,Nby=10){
  doseq(N,Nby)
  dt1 <- data.table(time = t.seq, val=val.seq, key="time")
  dt2 <- data.table(time = with(dt1, seq(min(time), max(time), by=1)), key = "time")
  dtf <- dt1[dt2, rolltolast = TRUE]
  return(dtf)
}

dirk <- function(N,Nby=10){
  doseq(N,Nby)
  xt1 <- xts(val.seq, t.seq)
  secs <- seq(start(xt1), end(xt1), by="1 sec")
  xtf <- zoo::na.locf(merge(xt1, xts(, secs)))
  return(xtf)
}

bm <- benchmark(josh(1e2,10), josh(1e3,10), josh(1e4,10), josh(1e5,10), josh(1e6,10),
  dirk(1e2,10), dirk(1e3,10), dirk(1e4,10), dirk(1e5,10), dirk(1e6,10),
  columns=c("test", "replications","elapsed", "relative"),
  replications=10)

print(bm)

giving:

              test replications elapsed relative
6    dirk(100, 10)           10   0.024    1.000
7   dirk(1000, 10)           10   0.026    1.083
8  dirk(10000, 10)           10   0.044    1.833
9  dirk(1e+05, 10)           10   0.321   13.375
10 dirk(1e+06, 10)           10   3.342  139.250
1    josh(100, 10)           10   0.034    1.417
2   josh(1000, 10)           10   0.036    1.500
3  josh(10000, 10)           10   0.070    2.917
4  josh(1e+05, 10)           10   0.453   18.875
5  josh(1e+06, 10)           10   5.381  224.208

So it seems they aren't too different, but the xts method is somewhat faster than the data.table method.

share|improve this question
    
Yes. Could you add the answer to "why" to your question? I'm guessing what you're trying to achieve as an end result has an even better solution than the one you're looking for. –  John Sep 13 '12 at 22:57
    
Why? Because I'll be sharing data like these with other people, and I'd like to eliminate any ambiguity as to what the numbers represent. –  Andy Barbour Sep 14 '12 at 0:07
    
0.334s vs 0.538s seems a small difference of mean time. Are you sure that conclusion is robust? It includes the time to create the data in that, too, over and over again in each replication. I see much lower times when timing just the methods. -1 for now, can always be reversed later. –  Matt Dowle Sep 14 '12 at 13:16
    
@Matthew: So does your downvote mean that the post shows no research effort, is unclear, or not useful? Or you're just confused by the terms "aren't too different" and "somewhat"? –  Andy Barbour Sep 17 '12 at 18:05
    
@Andy Think you're quoting one of the reasons to close there. I didn't vote to close. I downvoted for the reason i wrote in comment above: poor and misleading benchmark in question. I explained, above, why imo the benchmark is poor. –  Matt Dowle Sep 17 '12 at 18:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, the xts package can help.

First, create an xts object:

R> pt <- strptime(c("02/10/11 10:26:35 AM", "02/10/11 10:26:38 AM", 
+                    "02/10/11 10:26:42 AM"), "%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S %p", tz="UTC")
R> vals <- c(0,1,0)
R> x <- xts(vals, pt)
R> x
                    [,1]
2011-10-02 10:26:35    0
2011-10-02 10:26:38    1
2011-10-02 10:26:42    0
Warning message:
timezone of object (UTC) is different than current timezone (). 
R> 

We can ignore the warning -- I have a US timezone.

Now, we can create a sequence of seconds from the beginning to the end of that variable:

R> secs <- seq(start(x), end(x), by="1 sec")

And now for the magic: by merging our original with an 'empty' object of that grid, we expand to the gridL

R> x2 <- merge(x, xts(, secs))
R> x2
                     x
2011-10-02 10:26:35  0
2011-10-02 10:26:36 NA
2011-10-02 10:26:37 NA
2011-10-02 10:26:38  1
2011-10-02 10:26:39 NA
2011-10-02 10:26:40 NA
2011-10-02 10:26:41 NA
2011-10-02 10:26:42  0
Warning message:
timezone of object (UTC) is different than current timezone (). 

All is left is to call na.locf():

R> x2 <- na.locf(merge(x, xts(, secs)))
R> x2
                    x
2011-10-02 10:26:35 0
2011-10-02 10:26:36 0
2011-10-02 10:26:37 0
2011-10-02 10:26:38 1
2011-10-02 10:26:39 1
2011-10-02 10:26:40 1
2011-10-02 10:26:41 1
2011-10-02 10:26:42 0
Warning message:
timezone of object (UTC) is different than current timezone (). 
R> 
share|improve this answer

Here's how you could do that using the data.table package:

library(data.table)

## Some example data
X <- data.table(time = Sys.time() + c(0,3,7), val=c(0,1,0), key = "time")

## A data.table with one row for each second spanned by X
Y <- data.table(time = with(X, seq(min(time), max(time), by=1)), key = "time")

## Merge them
X[Y, rolltolast = TRUE]
#                   time val
# 1: 2012-09-13 15:58:53   0
# 2: 2012-09-13 15:58:54   0
# 3: 2012-09-13 15:58:55   0
# 4: 2012-09-13 15:58:56   1
# 5: 2012-09-13 15:58:57   1
# 6: 2012-09-13 15:58:58   1
# 7: 2012-09-13 15:58:59   1
# 8: 2012-09-13 15:59:00   0
share|improve this answer
    
Same result, different tool. Thanks. –  Andy Barbour Sep 14 '12 at 0:11
    
@AndyBarbour Nice comment. Noted. –  Matt Dowle Sep 14 '12 at 1:04

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