Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Coming from Java I was trying to implement a simple Battleships game in C++ but already got stuck at this Array:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

using namespace std;

class Ship{
    private:
        int length;
        bool direction; //false = left, true = down
        pair <int,int> coords[];
    public:
        Ship(int x, int y, bool, int);
        void printship();
};

Ship::Ship(int x, int y, bool dir, int l){ 
    pair <int,int> coords[l];
    length = l;
    if (dir){
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++){
            coords[i] = make_pair(x, y+i);
        }   
    }   
    else{
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++){
            coords[i] = make_pair(x+i, y); 
        }   
    }   
}
void Ship::printship(){
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++){
        cout << "x: " << coords[i].first << ", y: " << coords[i].second << endl;
    }   
}

int main(){
    Ship tests(2,3,true,3);
    tests.printship();
    return 0;
}

What I get is:

x: 134515168, y: 0
x: 0, y: 9938131
x: 1, y: -1080624940

I guess something is pointing to unallocated memory, but I can't figure out what, and why.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by tenfour, akappa, Evgeny Kluev, Bo Persson, Joce Apr 3 '13 at 16:27

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have two different variables both called coords. One is a private member variable, the other is local to the constructor. Because the local variable you create in the constructor shadows the member variable, the constructor never initializes the member variable.

Try this instead:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Ship{
    private:
        int length;
        bool direction; //false = left, true = down
        vector< pair <int,int> > coords; // *** CHANGE HERE
    public:
        Ship(int x, int y, bool, int);
        void printship();
};

Ship::Ship(int x, int y, bool dir, int l){ 
    length = l;
    if (dir){
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++){
            coords.push_back(make_pair(x, y+i)); // *** CHANGE HERE
        }   
    }   
    else{
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++){
            coords.push_back(make_pair(x+i, y)); // *** CHANGE HERE
        }   
    }   
}
void Ship::printship(){
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++){
        cout << "x: " << coords[i].first << ", y: " << coords[i].second << endl;
    }   
}

int main(){
    Ship tests(2,3,true,3);
    tests.printship();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, ok, I get it. I can't have the Array only get a size at Runtime. I considered using Vectors but I thought it would be possible with an Array too. Thanks! –  1nterference Sep 13 '12 at 22:53
1  
It is, but it's much harder that way. You'll basically wind up re-implementing vector. –  David Schwartz Sep 13 '12 at 22:54
    
@1nterference: you should accept his answer by clicking on the tick below the voting arrows. –  akappa Sep 13 '12 at 22:56

In your constructor you have a local variable coords which you initialize instead of your member variable. Also you should probably a a vector instead of an array because then you do not need to worry about allocating and releasing memory:

class Ship{
private:
    bool direction; //false = left, true = down
    vector<pair<int,int>> coords;
public:
    Ship(int x, int y, bool, int);
    void printship();
};

Ship::Ship(int x, int y, bool dir, int l){ 
    if (dir){
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++){
           coords.push_back(make_pair(x, y+i));
        }   
    }   
    else{
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++){
           coords.push_back(make_pair(x+i, y)); 
        }   
    }   
}

void Ship::printship(){
    for (vector<pair<int, int>>::iterator it = coords.begin(); it != coords.end(); ++it)
        cout << "x: " << it->first << ", y: " << it->second << endl;
    }   
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.