Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I thought that the whole point of PODs (c++11, trivial + standard-layout) is to make sure the type is compatible with C.

Given the following code:

// that one is a standard layout, and trivial which makes it a c++11 POD
struct Bar
{
public:
  int x;
public:
  int y;
};

AFAIU, compiler might reorder x and y. Wouldn't that break compatibility with C?

Why that 98/03 POD definition relaxation in c++11 considered to be a good idea?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

AFAIU, compiler might reorder x and y. Wouldn't that break compatibility with C?

In C++03, it can. In C++11 it cannot. C++11's standard layout rules only require that all of the members have the same access control. They don't have to be declared in the same access control region.

Why that 98/03 POD definition relaxation in c++11 considered to be a good idea?

I think you're misunderstanding things. The C++11 rules allow more types to be standard-layout (and thus potentially layout-compatible with C types), not less. Thus, there's no real downside to relaxing the rules.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was missing that part where C++11 cannot reorder it in that case. –  Kobi Sep 14 '12 at 15:58
add comment

I thought that the whole point of PODs (c++11, trivial + standard-layout) is to make sure the type is compatible with C.

Not exactly the whole point of it, but yes, that is one of the properties of PODs.

// that one is a standard layout, and trivial which makes it a c++11 POD

Correct.

AFAIU, compiler might reorder x and y. Wouldn't that break compatibility with C?

We already established it is a POD, which means the compiler will maintain compatibility with C. Maintaining compatibility with C does not break compatibility with C.

Why that 98/03 POD definition relaxation in c++11 considered to be a good idea?

Because it doesn't break anything.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh.. Thanks a bunch. I think I got it now. So Standard layout + trivial --> POD and in that case c++11 compiler will not (or is not allowed to) reorder x and y to maintain C comp. –  Kobi Sep 14 '12 at 15:57
    
@Kobi yes. And to be precise, that's a consequence of standard layout alone. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '12 at 16:06
    
OK. your comment of "standard layout alone" makes things even clearer to me. thx! –  Kobi Sep 14 '12 at 16:22
add comment

The point of POD is not just to make sure the type is compatible with C - note that a type with an access specifier (public, private, etc.) is by definition not compatible with C since C doesn't have access specifiers. The main property of a POD type is that it can be memcpy'ed around.

Having more than one access specifier in a C++ type does permit the compiler to lay out the type in a non-specified way, and that's been true for a while (it's not new with C++11):

From C++03 9.2/12

Nonstatic data members of a (non-union) class declared without an intervening access-specifier are allocated so that later members have higher addresses within a class object. The order of allocation of nonstatic data members separated by an access-specifier is unspecified (11.1).

However, that doesn't make a type a non-POD - it can still be a POD, just not one that can be portably expressed in C.

share|improve this answer
2  
Noting that in C++11, any trivially-copyable type can be memcpy'd, not just POD types. –  ildjarn Sep 13 '12 at 23:47
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.