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I try to hash a string using sha256, I'm using the following code:

using System;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
using System.Text;
 public class Hash
    {
    public static string getHashSha256(string text)
    {
        byte[] bytes = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(text);
        SHA256Managed hashstring = new SHA256Managed();
        byte[] hash = hashstring.ComputeHash(bytes);
        string hashString = string.Empty;
        foreach (byte x in hash)
        {
            hashString += String.Format("{0:x2}", x);
        }
        return hashString;
    }
}

However, this code gives significantly different results compared to my friends php, as well as online generators (such as This generator)

Does anyone know what the error is? Different bases?

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Off topic but keep in mind that creating a StringBuilder and using AppendFormat instead of String.Format in your foreach loop will prevent your code from needlessly creating lots of string objects. –  Marcel Lamothe Nov 7 at 13:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Encoding.Unicode is Microsoft's misleading name for UTF-16 (a double-wide encoding, used in the Windows world for historical reasons but not used by anyone else). http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.text.encoding.unicode.aspx

If you inspect your bytes array, you'll see that every second byte is 0x00 (because of the double-wide encoding).

You should be using Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes instead.

But also, you will see different results depending on whether or not you consider the terminating '\0' byte to be part of the data you're hashing. Hashing the two bytes "Hi" will give a different result from hashing the three bytes "Hi". You'll have to decide which you want to do. (Presumably you want to do whichever one your friend's PHP code is doing.)

For ASCII text, Encoding.UTF8 will definitely be suitable. If you're aiming for perfect compatibility with your friend's code, even on non-ASCII inputs, you'd better try a few test cases with non-ASCII characters such as é and and see whether your results still match up. If not, you'll have to figure out what encoding your friend is really using; it might be one of the 8-bit "code pages" that used to be popular before the invention of Unicode. (Again, I think Windows is the main reason that anyone still needs to worry about "code pages".)

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This is part of a log-in system, just switching to UTF8.GetBytes() did the trick, thank you :D –  Nattfrosten Sep 14 '12 at 0:03
    
It is to my understanding that PHP uses ASCII by default. –  Cole Johnson Sep 14 '12 at 1:13
    
ASCII and UTF-8 are for all practical purposes the same, so, good. :) But I've added a paragraph pointing out that they will encode high-byte characters differently, so some tweaking may be required. –  Quuxplusone Sep 14 '12 at 1:28
    
Your comments are incorrect: UTF16 is Unicode. There is nothing misleading about it. Codepages are dead since decades. Windows is no reason to worry about codepages. Since Windows NT Microsoft made big efforts to convert the entire OS to unicode. On the other hand Linux and PHP did the cheap workaround: Instead of using Unicode they still use UTF8. This is not clever. Example: If you want a sorted directory listing in Linux you must convert the UTF8 file names to Unicode, sort them and convert back to UTF8. This is inefficient and awkward. Windows uses wide strings that you can sort directly –  Elmue Oct 31 at 22:47
    
@Elmue, you may be pleased to learn that "sorting by UTF8-encoded bytes" and "sorting by Unicode codepoints" are equivalent! (As is "sorting by UTF16-encoded shorts", but not "sorting by UTF16-encoded bytes" unless you're on a big-endian system, which Windows isn't.) However, "sorting" in Unicode is really a complicated topic that should be saved for another day. –  Quuxplusone Nov 2 at 1:17

U should salt your password before you hash it:

private const string _salt = "P&0myWHq";    

private static string CalculateHashedPassword(string clearpwd)
{
    using (var sha = SHA256.Create())
    {
       var computedHash = sha.ComputeHash(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(clearpwd+_salt));
       return Convert.ToBase64String(computedHash);
    }
}
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2  
Technically that's a pepper. A salt is generated, and stored with the final hash. A pepper is hardcoded or preferably stored on a safe and/or remote server. –  Ultroman the Tacoman Sep 1 at 9:24

I also had this problem with another style of implementation but I forgot where I got it since it was 2 years ago.

static string sha256(string password)
    {
        SHA256Managed crypt = new SHA256Managed();
        string hash = String.Empty;
        byte[] crypto = crypt.ComputeHash(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(password), 0, Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(password));
        foreach (byte bit in crypto)
        {
            hash += bit.ToString("x2");
        }
        return hash;
    }

When I input something like "abcdefghi2013" for some reason it gives different results and results in errors in my login module. Then I tried modifying the code the same way as suggested by Quuxplusone and changed the encoding from ASCII to UTF8 then it finally worked!

static string sha256(string password)
    {
        SHA256Managed crypt = new SHA256Managed();
        string hash = String.Empty;
        byte[] crypto = crypt.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(password), 0, Encoding.UTF8.GetByteCount(password));
        foreach (byte bit in crypto)
        {
            hash += bit.ToString("x2");
        }
        return hash;
    }

Thanks again Quuxplusone for the wonderful and detailed answer! :)

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