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Given this example in Python

sample = '5PB37L2CH5DUDWN2SUOYE6LJPYCJBFM5N2FGVEHF7HD224UR52KB===='
a = base64.b32decode(sample)
b = base64.b32encode(a)

why is it that

sample != b ?

BUT where

sample = '5PB37L2CH5DUDWN2SUOYE6LJPYCJBFM5N2FGVEHF7HD224UR52KBAAAA'

then

sample == b

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

the first sample you got there is invalid base64.

taken from wiki:

When the number of bytes to encode is not divisible by 3 (that is, if there are only one or two bytes of input for the last block), then the following action is performed: Add extra bytes with value zero so there are three bytes, and perform the conversion to base64. If there was only one significant input byte, only the first two base64 digits are picked, and if there were two significant input bytes, the first three base64 digits are picked. '=' characters might be added to make the last block contain four base64 characters.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64#Examples

edit:

taken from RFC 4648:

Special processing is performed if fewer than 24 bits are available
at the end of the data being encoded. A full encoding quantum is
always completed at the end of a quantity. When fewer than 24 input
bits are available in an input group, bits with value zero are added
(on the right) to form an integral number of 6-bit groups. Padding
at the end of the data is performed using the '=' character.

4 times 8bits (the ='s) (at the end of your sample) is more than 24bits so they are at the least unneccessary. (not sure what datatype sample is, but find out and take it's size times number of characters divided by 24)

about your particular sample:

base-encoding reads in 24bit chunks and only needs '=' padding characters at the end of the base'd string to make whatever was left of the string after splitting it into 24bit chunks be "of size 24" so it can be parsed by the decoder. since the ===='s at the end of your string amount to more than 24bits they are useless, hence: invalid...

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Hi, I dont follow why 1st sample is invalid? Can you please break it down. a = base64.b32decode(sample) works just fine on it. –  TurbZ Sep 14 '12 at 0:58
    
Hi, thank you for your answer can you please expand on it more? The sample is a Base32 string which I am trying to pass into apns-python-wrapper. Maybe the encode and decode end bit is a rotating bit and my attempt to validate using encode and decode might be invalid here? –  TurbZ Sep 14 '12 at 15:23
    
see my edit above –  Gung Foo Sep 14 '12 at 16:03
    
Great, thank you! –  TurbZ Sep 14 '12 at 17:41

First, let's be clear: your question is about base32, not base64.

Your original sample is a bit too long. There are 4 = padding at the end, meaning at least 20 bits of padding. The number of bits must be a multiple of 8 so it's really 24 bits. The encoding for B in base32 is 1, which means one of the padding bits is set. This is a violation of the spec, which says all the padding bits must be clear. The decode drops the bit completely, and the encode produces the proper value A instead of B.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for your answer. Can you please expand on it more? The sample is a Base32 string which I am trying to pass into apns-python-wrapper. Maybe the encode and decode end bit is a rotating bit and my attempt to validate using encode and decode might be invalid here? –  TurbZ Sep 14 '12 at 15:22
    
@TurbZ, the input is invalid. The last encoded bit is a 1 when it must be a 0 because it is part of the padding. Decoding and encoding it again fixes it, so it no longer matches the original. –  Mark Ransom Sep 14 '12 at 15:26
    
Ok got it. Thanks Mark. –  TurbZ Sep 14 '12 at 15:37

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