Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please explain to me why the very last "echo" statement is blank? I expect that it was incremented in the while loop to a value of 1:

#!/bin/bash
OUTPUT="name1 ip ip status" # normally output of another command with multi line output

if [ -z "$OUTPUT" ]
then
        echo "Status WARN: No messages from SMcli"
        exit $STATE_WARNING
else
        echo "$OUTPUT"|while read NAME IP1 IP2 STATUS
        do
                if [ "$STATUS" != "Optimal" ]
                then
                        echo "CRIT: $NAME - $STATUS"
                        echo $((++XCODE))
                else
                        echo "OK: $NAME - $STATUS"
                fi
        done
fi

echo $XCODE

I've tried using the following statement instead of the ++XCODE method

XCODE=`expr $XCODE + 1`

and it too wont print outside of the while statement. I think I'm missing something about variable scope here but the ol' man page isnt showing it to me.

share|improve this question
    
Where do you initialize XCODE to something that can be incremented? –  Paul Tomblin Sep 23 '08 at 21:57
    
I've tried to throw an "XCODE=0" at the top of the code, outside of the while statement –  Matt P Sep 23 '08 at 21:59
    
Without the cruft, it works for me. #!/bin/bash for i in 1 2 3 4 5; do echo $((++XCODE)) done echo "fin:" $XCODE I think your problem has nothing to do with variable scoping and everything to do with what's happening in the while. –  Paul Tomblin Sep 23 '08 at 22:08
    
Agreed.. it seems like it has to do with the "while read" loop? –  Matt P Sep 23 '08 at 22:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Because you're piping into the while loop, a sub shell is created to run the while loop. Now this child process has it's own copy of the environment and can't pass any variables back to its parent (as in any unix process).

Therefore you'll need to restructure so that you're not piping into the loop. Alternatively you could run in a function for example and echo the value you want returned from the sub process.

http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/subshells.html#SUBSHELL

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense.. Thanks. Looks like the function is the way to go for me. –  Matt P Sep 23 '08 at 22:36

The problem is that processes put together with a pipe are executed in subshells (and therefore have their own environment). Whatever happens within the while does not affect anything outside of the pipe.

Your specific example can be solved by rewriting the pipe to

while ... do ... done <<< "$OUTPUT"

or perhaps

while ... do ... done < <(echo "$OUTPUT")
share|improve this answer
1  
Brilliant. I had not seen the < < syntax before, so shall have to read up on it, but this works a treat. It feels odd to have the input command at the end rather than the beginning, but it works. –  Jonathan Oct 31 '08 at 19:32
1  
I also didn't know the <( command ) syntax, and this has saved me a lot of time and headaches. a big +1 to you sir :) –  Carlos Campderrós Jan 30 '13 at 12:29
11  
For those who are looking on at this confused as to what the whole <() syntax is (like I was), it's called "Process Substitution", and the specific usage detailed above can be seen here: mywiki.wooledge.org/ProcessSubstitution –  Ross Aiken Feb 19 '13 at 14:53
    
thank you this was exactly what I was looking for! –  memnoch_proxy Apr 4 at 3:37
 #!/bin/bash
 OUTPUT="name1 ip ip status"
+export XCODE=0;
 if [ -z "$OUTPUT" ]
----

                     echo "CRIT: $NAME - $STATUS"
-                    echo $((++XCODE))
+                    export XCODE=$(( $XCODE + 1 ))
             else

echo $XCODE

see if those changes help

share|improve this answer
    
When doing this, I now get a "0" to print for the last echo statement. however I expect the value to be 1 not zero. Also, why the use of export? I assume that forces it into the environment? –  Matt P Sep 23 '08 at 22:09

Another option is to output the results into a file from the subshell and then read it in the parent shell. something like

#!/bin/bash
EXPORTFILE=/tmp/exportfile${RANDOM}
cat /tmp/randomFile | while read line
do
    LINE="$LINE $line"
    echo $LINE > $EXPORTFILE
done
LINE=$(cat $EXPORTFILE)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.