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I've read a large number of articles and Stack Overflow questions about converting an XML document or fragment into an array in PHP, but none that I've read so far have addressed my specific problem. Here's my dilemma, preceded by an example XML fragment:

<category>
  <template>
    <random>
      <li>And a good</li>
      <li>Pleasant</li>
      <li>Good</li>
      <li>Fantabulous</li>
    </random>
    <set name="TOD"><srai>time of day</srai></set> to you, <get name="name" />.
    <random>
      <li>How are you?</li>
      <li>To what do I owe the pleasure of this visit?</li>
      <li>May your Athlete's Foot be under control, and may the flying monkeys never come to take your dog!</li>
      <li>I trust your <get name="TOD" /> is going well?</li>
      <li>May your <get name="TOD" /> be as pleasant as possible.</li>
    </random>
  </template>
</category>

This is a REAL WORLD example of some of the XML my script will be dealing with. The sequence order of the XML tags needs to be preserved, as the parsed results need to be concatenated correctly in order to provide the proper result. So far, all of the methods for converting XML fragments into arrays have created arrays that no longer contain the correct order. As an example, here's a var dump of the above XML, once it's been converted into an array:

Template array Var Dump: 
array(4) {
  ["random"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    array(1) {
      ["li"]=>
      array(4) {
        [0]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(10) "And a good"
        }
        [1]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(8) "Pleasant"
        }
        [2]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(4) "Good"
        }
        [3]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(11) "Fantabulous"
        }
      }
    }
    [1]=>
    array(1) {
      ["li"]=>
      array(5) {
        [0]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(12) "How are you?"
        }
        [1]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(44) "To what do I owe the pleasure of this visit?"
        }
        [2]=>
        array(1) {
          ["text"]=>
          string(97) "May your Athlete's Foot be under control, and may the flying monkeys never come to take your dog!"
        }
        [3]=>
        array(2) {
          ["text"]=>
          array(2) {
            [0]=>
            string(12) "I trust your"
            [1]=>
            string(14) "is going well?"
          }
          ["get"]=>
          array(1) {
            ["@attributes"]=>
            array(1) {
              ["name"]=>
              string(3) "TOD"
            }
          }
        }
        [4]=>
        array(2) {
          ["text"]=>
          array(2) {
            [0]=>
            string(8) "May your"
            [1]=>
            string(27) "be as pleasant as possible."
          }
          ["get"]=>
          array(1) {
            ["@attributes"]=>
            array(1) {
              ["name"]=>
              string(3) "TOD"
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
  ["set"]=>
  array(2) {
    ["@attributes"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["name"]=>
      string(3) "TOD"
    }
    ["srai"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["text"]=>
      string(11) "time of day"
    }
  }
  ["text"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(7) "to you,"
    [1]=>
    string(1) "."
  }
  ["get"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["@attributes"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["name"]=>
      string(4) "name"
    }
  }
}

As can be seen, the array, when created, "lost" the sequence order of the XML fragment, and you can't iterate through the array in a linear manner to arrive at the proper response. This is the crux of my problem, and what I'm looking to "fix".

The method I used in this example was json_decode(json_encode($xml), true), but I've used other, more complex script functions, with pretty much the same results. So, just as I asked in the title of this post, how can I preserve the "tag order" when converting an XML fragment to an array in PHP?

share|improve this question
1  
Well JSON specifies that keys are not ordered, therefore it is obvious that the order will be lost if you turn it into JSON. – clentfort Sep 18 '12 at 17:46
    
I wasn't aware of that, though I've read in several articles that JSON is still considered to be a "work in progress", so perhaps there's hope for improvement. :) – Dave Morton Sep 19 '12 at 15:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pretty sure there are no flags available with say simpleXML or json_decode. I don't think XML is intended to preserve that. The structure is not intended to convey that, can see how it leads to bad design. Specific to XML, you can get around this by use of sequence in an XSD. But your data looks more like a DOM.

As a work around have you looked at parsing it with as a DOM Document and stepping through it? Not too much code to parse it yourself leveraging that.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure which 'flag' you're referring to, unless it's the 'true' flag in the bit of code I posted towards the end (e.g. json_decode(json_encode($xml), true) ). That particular flag assures that the function returns an array, rather than an object. As to working with a DOM Document, I've tried a couple of different methods to achieve my goals, but there seemed to be a LOT more code than what I would consider to be efficient. Maybe I'm just spoiled, and expecting too much? :) – Dave Morton Sep 15 '12 at 23:07
1  
Yeah, was saying I am not aware of anything to enable that behavior if you are not getting it as is. I think a good XML parser should retain the natural order of the elements. I would guess that LibXML does (but not by default with PHP?). Think you'll need to write your own recursive parse method with DOMDocument. – ficuscr Sep 17 '12 at 4:35
    
That's what I ended up having to do, in fact. The script's a "Frankenstein's Monster", consisting of SimpleXMLElement and SimpleXMLIterator objects, some "cheap & dirty" array casting for certain, specific elements, and a "quick fix" function that detects mixed content and wraps 'untagged' content in <text> tags, basically changing <mixed>some text <tag name="here" /> and more text</mixed> into <mixed><text>some text </text><tag name="here" /><text> and more text</text></mixed>. Overall, the script is like a pit bull puppy; it's so ugly, it's cute. :) – Dave Morton Sep 18 '12 at 5:18
    
What no preg in there too? :) – ficuscr Sep 18 '12 at 14:42
    
No, regular expressions and myself just don't get along. However, there are a few str_replace() lines. :) – Dave Morton Sep 18 '12 at 17:37

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