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I am not really a programmer but a computational statistician, so I may understand complex algorithms but not simple programming constructs.

My original problem is to check within a function if a module function is callable. I looked around and decided to go for a try (call function) - except (import module) to make it simple. I'd love to search sys.mod for this but I am running in some identifiability problems.

My current problem is that there are many ways of importing a function from a module: import module will define the function as module.function but from module import function will define it as function. Not to mention from module import function as myfunction. Therefore the same function can be called in several different ways.

My question is: is there a unique "signature" for a function that can be traced if the module is loaded? It would be fantastic to have the actual call alias to it.

ps besides: mod is mathematical function and sys.mod returns a list of loaded modules, but python (2.7) does not complain when you shadow the built-in mod function by doing the following, from sys import mod. I find this a bit awkward - is there any way to avoid this sort of shadowing programatically?

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Please use the formatting buttons at the top, instead of making up your own formatting conventions. –  Marcin Sep 14 '12 at 2:35
3  
"mod is mathematical function": In Python, that mod is spelled %. mod has no special intrinsic meaning to Python. Therefore there's no problem importing that name from some module. Also, there's no sys.mod (there's sys.modules though). –  kindall Sep 14 '12 at 2:37
    
I'm curious why you need to check if a module function is callable. That might not really be your original problem. –  Keith Sep 14 '12 at 4:32
    
Thank you all very much for the useful comments, I really appreciate it. I am still puzzled that objects don't have some kind a unique id. But this is probably because I don't understand well o.o programming. What I am going to do is from module import function as myfunc without checking and forget about the whole problem. I swear that at home I could call mod and get sys.modules. I can't do it at the office. No idea how I did it. Best, marco –  Marco Stamazza Sep 14 '12 at 4:52
1  
@Marco: they do have a unique ID, though, see my answer. –  Matthew Trevor Sep 14 '12 at 6:56

3 Answers 3

My original problem is to check within a function if a module function is callable.

By definition, all functions are callable. This will test if an object is callable: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#callable

Therefore the same function can be called in several different ways.

Yes, but it will be the same object. You can just use f is g to test if f and g are the same object.

Update: Why would you need to use a unique ID? Seriously, don't do this. You have is for identity tests, and the __hash__ method to define the hash function applicable.

It would be fantastic to have the actual call alias to it.

Not sure at all what you mean, but I think you just want it to always be one object. Which it is already.

mod is mathematical function and sys.mod returns a list of loaded modules, but python (2.7) does not complain to from sys import mod. I find this a bit awkward?

Then don't do that. You know about the import ... as syntax. Also mod is not by default in the global namespace (the operator % is for that).

Finally, python does complain about your import line:

>>> from sys import mod
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ImportError: cannot import name mod

(Thanks to kindall for pointing this out).

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Assume I have a module with the following:

def foo(): pass
bar = foo

You can easily see that they're the same functions by using is or id():

>>> import demo
>>> from demo import *
>>> demo.foo is foo
True
>>> id(demo.foo) == id(foo)
True
>>> demo.bar is foo
True

They all refer to the same code object, it's just stored under different names in the scope dictionary.

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# define modulus f
def mod(a,b):
    return b % a

print mod(5,2)

alias:

modulus=mod
print modulus(5,2)

this is pretty pythonic construct, and it is pretty intuitive for mathematicians

different ways of import serve to help you place a function into different "name space" for later use in your program, sometimes you wish to use a function a lot so you choose variant that is shorter to write.

you can also do something like:

myat=math.atanh 

to make alias in another "name space"

and use it as:

myat(x)

as it would use math.atanh(x) - becomes shorter to write

Typical programmers approach would be define all you want to use and then use it. What you are trying in my belief is to do it "lazy" => import module when you need a function. That is why you wish to know if function is "callable".

Python is not functional programming language (e.g. like haskel) so that you can load or refer "on demand".

hope this helps.

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1  
Actually, it is possible to load things lazily in python. It's far from clear this is what OP is asking about. –  Marcin Sep 14 '12 at 3:18
    
If you'd explain the "lazy" technique I believe that would help him. I am not THAT good with python. –  ljgww Sep 14 '12 at 3:33

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