Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to make a small sinatra example that will print a calendar view for either a month, day or year depending on the URL. Such that

localhost:4567/calendar/2012 will print a year view calendar

localhost:4567/calendar/2012/9 will print a month calendar

localhost:4567/calendar/2012/9/15 will print a day view calendar

I have this working as this:

require 'sinatra'

get '/calendar/:year/:month/:day/?' do
    "printing daily calendar for #{params[:year]}/#{params[:month]}/#{params[:day]}"
end

get '/calendar/:year/:month/?' do
    "printing monthly calendar for #{params[:year]}/#{params[:month]}"
end

get '/calendar/:year/?' do
    "printing yearly calendar for #{params[:year]}"
end

My question is, can I further refine those routes with some kind of RegEx so that I can say the url only counts if the :month portion is between 1 and 12 and the :day portion is between 1 and 31?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes. You can specify regex in sinatra routing condition. See sinatra readme for more information.

get %r{/calendar/([\d]+)/(1[0-2]|0?[1-9])/([12][0-9]|3[0-1]|0?[1-9])$} do 
  "hello #{params[:captures]}"
end

get %r{/calendar/([\d]+)/(1[0-2]|0?[1-9])$} do 
  "hello #{params[:captures]}"        
end

# host/2012/11 will print "hello [2012, 11]"
# params[:captures] will return an array containing what match the regular expressions
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, was this answer meant to replicate my example? Because from what I can tell: host/2012/9 returns the same as host/2012/99999 and host/2012/9/15. They all produce "hello ["2012", "9"] –  Chris Valentine Sep 14 '12 at 5:33
    
@ChrisValentine There was a flaw in my old regex. The month part will match any string containing 1-12. So 99999 will match. And for host/2012/9/15/, there should be another route like %r{/calendar/[\d]+/regex_for_month/regex_for_days} –  halfelf Sep 14 '12 at 5:42
    
Thanks a lot, this really helped me to figure it out. As a side note do you know how to alter the regex_for_year portion to only accept positive integer values, as of now it will work if the year is 0. Thx again. –  Chris Valentine Sep 14 '12 at 6:26
    
@ChrisValentine I guess some regex like (?<!\-)\d{4} will work. But since maybe someone want a year like 4000 BC, it is not a bad idea to accept negative values. –  halfelf Sep 14 '12 at 6:58
    
Yes, that is also something to consider. Thanks again. –  Chris Valentine Sep 14 '12 at 14:45

If you are using ruby 1.9+, you can use named captures like this:

get %r{/(?<year>\d{4})/(?<month>\d{2})/(?<day>\d{2})/?} do
 "printing daily calendar for #{params[:year]}/#{params[:month]}/#{params[:day]}"
end

get %r{/(?<year>\d{4})/(?<month>\d{2})/?} do
  "printing monthly calendar for #{params[:year]}/#{params[:month]}"
end

get %r{/(?<year>\d{4})/?} do
  "printing monthly calendar for #{params[:year]}"
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.