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I am working on a game server running on the Azure cloud and I've hit a bit of a roadblock. The game itself is based around a series of worlds, each of which running on a different worker role and having separate terrain data. I however do not know how I can make the main worker role I use for managing those worlds to start the world roles and configure them to load the correct map. I also don't know how I can make sure that the client connects to the world requested instead of some random other world.

If anyone could link me to the correct APIs to do this that would be appreciated.

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Worker roles are background processes. They are the equivalent of Windows services on a desktop or server. Your users are not supposed to deal with them directly. They are supposed to interact with your Web role. –  Guillaume Sep 14 '12 at 7:16
    
The Azure project uses worker roles for direct TCP and UDP connections, a web role is not used. –  Kelvin Bongers Sep 14 '12 at 7:20

2 Answers 2

My recommendation would be to create a master/controller that is an endpoint (proxy if you like) for the worlds. All connections come to it and it then routes them directly to the back end world specific server. This connection can be very thin (I'm thinking just an IP tunnel once the connection has been established), so it won't add much latency to it.

Now there's a couple gotchas with this approach.

The proxy can only handle a limited number of active connections. So you have to have a way to monitor this and route traffic to a secondary proxy/relay. Windows Azure's built in load balancer should do nicely for this, you just need to monitor active connections and use that info to control your scaling behaviors.

Additionally, idle connections will be killed by the Windows Azure load balancer, so your proxy will need to be able to detect when a connection has been killed so it can free up those resources to service another connection.

The upside to this approach is that if your world servers go off-line or are moved around (and they will be at some point), the proxy can detect where the workload has moved and shift connections accordingly, making it seemless to your external users.

Now there's one other approach to all this that would also work. The Windows Azure Service Bus relay. Each "world" server would have its own endpoint on the service bus and when a client asks to connect, it comes to the controlling "proxy" and gets the endpoint for its requested server. You can take this one a step further by enabling hybrid connections which will encourage the client and the server to negotiate a direct connection and thus reduce any relay latency. And the service bus endpoint, since its a published location, resolves any issues with machine specific addressability.

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In your solution you can create multiple worker roles and create an endpoint for each role with a specific port (the same port cannot be used for different roles). Note that I'm using an input endpoint in order to have the endpoints load balanced.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ServiceDefinition name="CloudPathDemo" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2008/10/ServiceDefinition" schemaVersion="2012-05.1.7">
  <WorkerRole name="WorkerMainWorld" vmsize="Small">
    <Imports>
      <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" />
    </Imports>
    <Endpoints>
      <InputEndpoint name="Endpoint1" protocol="tcp" port="50000" />
    </Endpoints>
  </WorkerRole>
  <WorkerRole name="WorkerWorld1" vmsize="Small">
    <Imports>
      <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" />
    </Imports>
    <Endpoints>
      <InputEndpoint name="Endpoint1" protocol="tcp" port="50001" />
    </Endpoints>
  </WorkerRole>
  <WorkerRole name="WorkerWorld2" vmsize="Small">
    <Imports>
      <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" />
    </Imports>
    <Endpoints>
      <InputEndpoint name="Endpoint1" protocol="tcp" port="50002" />
    </Endpoints>
  </WorkerRole>
  <WorkerRole name="WorkerWorld3" vmsize="Small">
    <Imports>
      <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" />
    </Imports>
    <Endpoints>
      <InputEndpoint name="Endpoint1" protocol="tcp" port="50003" />
    </Endpoints>
  </WorkerRole>
</ServiceDefinition>

Now, if you want your client or your 'main' worker role to connect to world 3 for example, you would send the tcp requests to mygame.cloudapp.net:50003 for example.

If you want to make the 'terrain management' somehow dynamic you could work with topics and subscriptions. Let's assume each WorkerRole has 1 topic, and each instance is 1 subscription. Then you could send a message to a specific topic saying which worlds should be provisioned on that WorkerRole, and each instance of that WorkerRole will receive that message and do the necessary provisioning. Ofcourse, you'll need to take into account that instances might be added later (when you scale up), so these instances will also need to know which worlds should be provisioned (by reading the list from table storage from example).

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The amount of worlds being run on the cloud project is a lot bigger then what this would effectively allow, would it be possible to change the port a specific instance uses? (So, by default it would accept connections on for example port 50001 and then receive what world it has to load and what port it should use from the main world manager worker role) –  Kelvin Bongers Sep 14 '12 at 8:39
    
If you want to connect to a specific instance, you should look at InstanceInput endpoints. These allow you to specify a range of ports that will be mapped on the instances. More info: haishibai.blogspot.be/2012/06/quick-look-at-cloud-service.html. Note that you'll need to take into account that instances might go offline. –  Sandrino Di Mattia Sep 14 '12 at 9:09

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