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I am trying to understand threading concepts in .Net. I am unable to use Yield() method. I want the control to go to a parallel thread when i becomes divisible by 10.

Please help.

Below is my sample code:

class ThreadTest
{
    //Index i is declared as static so that both the threads have only one copy
    static int i;


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(WriteY);          
        i = 0;

        //Start thread Y    
        t.Start();                              
        //Do something on the main thread.
        for (; i < 100; i++)
        {
            if (i % 10 == 0)
            {
                //Simulate Yield() function
                Thread.Sleep(0);
                Console.WriteLine("The X thread");
            }
            Console.Write(i + ":X ");
        }
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }

    static void WriteY()
    {
        for (; i < 100; i++)
        {
            if (i % 10 == 0)
            {
                //Simulate Yield() function
                Thread.Sleep(0);
                Console.WriteLine("The Y thread");
            }
            Console.Write(i + ":Y ");
        }
    }
}

I get the compile time error:

System.Threading.Thread does not contain a definition for 'Yield'

Answered by Tudor. This method will only work on .Net 4.0 and upwards.

Ideally I would want one thread to start and want each thread to execute for 10 incremented of i each. With my current method, I either get all 'X' or all 'Y'.

Edit: With inputs from Tudor and TheHe - I have been able to get alternate X and Y. The crux of the problem was usage of lock object. But the output of this code is not predictable.

share|improve this question
2  
You say "does not work" - well, what did you expect to happen, and how are you checking to see what actually happens? threading is all-kinds-of-complex, and a Thread.Yield is an incredibly subtle thing to try to observe. I've done a large amount of threading work, and that is not a method that I ever need to use. Take a step back: can you explain what is it you are trying to do here? –  Marc Gravell Sep 14 '12 at 8:26
1  
Yield is a .NET 4.0+ method. Are you running that version? –  Tudor Sep 14 '12 at 8:27
    
@Tudor, No. I am using VS 2008 and .Net 3.5. Thanks for the clarification. –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 8:32
    
With your edit, @Tudor is entirely correct - you are simply targeting the wrong framework version. Update to 4.0 or 4.5; however! I don't think this method is going to do what you think it is going to do. –  Marc Gravell Sep 14 '12 at 8:32
1  
In .NET versions lower than 4.0 you can somewhat emulate Yield with Thread.Sleep(0) if you really want, but in any case, the code above won't really work. –  Tudor Sep 14 '12 at 8:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thread.Yield will simply enable the scheduler to select a different thread that is ready to run:

Causes the calling thread to yield execution to another thread that is ready to run on the current processor. The operating system selects the thread to yield to.

If other threads in your application are also waiting on that lock, you can yield all you want, they won't get a chance to run.

Btw, Yield is a .NET 4.0+ method. Make sure you're not targeting an earlier version.

Edit: IMO, to do what you want you should use events:

class Test
{
    //Index i is declared as static so that both the threads have only one copy
    static int i;

    static AutoResetEvent parentEvent = new AutoResetEvent(true);
    static AutoResetEvent childEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(WriteY);

        i = 0;

        //Start thread Y
        t.Start();
        // Print X on the main thread
        parentEvent.WaitOne();
        while (i < 100)
        {                
            if (i % 10 == 0)
            {
                childEvent.Set();
                parentEvent.WaitOne();
            }
            Console.Write(i + ":Y ");
            i++;
        }
        t.Join();
    }

    static void WriteY()
    {
        childEvent.WaitOne();
        while (i < 100)
        {
            if (i % 10 == 0)
            {
                parentEvent.Set();
                childEvent.WaitOne();
            }
            Console.Write(i + ":X ");
            i++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this answers my question. I have updated my code block. Can you please let me know what is wrong with my simulation of Yield using Sleep? –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 8:46
    
@TheSilverBullet: See my edit for some code. –  Tudor Sep 14 '12 at 9:12
    
This code works awesome! It generated the same output for the 5 runs I did. Let me dig into this code now! Thanks so much! –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 9:18
    
Re the AutoResetEvent implementation; you can do this more simply with Monitor. –  Marc Gravell Sep 14 '12 at 9:23
    
@Marc Gravell: You're right in fact, but I've always had a weakness for events. :D –  Tudor Sep 14 '12 at 9:24

Forget Thread.Yield; that is unrelated to what you are trying to do. Ultimately, you have a lock, which uses Monitor to synchronize access. Inside the lock, your thread exclusively has access. What you need to do is relinquish the lock temporarily; the way you do that is with Monitor.Wait. However, if you Wait, you also end up in the "waiting" queue rather than the "ready" queue, so in order to make sure that each thread gets attention, we also need to Pulse, both before the Wait, and also at the end (to make sure both threads get chance to exit). Here we go:

using System.Threading;
using System;
class ThreadTest
{
    //Index i is declared as static so that both the threads have only one copy
    static int i;

    //The lock object
    static readonly object locker = new object();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(WriteY);

        i = 0;

        //Start thread Y
        t.Start();
        lock (locker)
        {
            // Print X on the main thread
            for (; i < 100; i++)
            {
                if (i % 10 == 0)
                {
                    Monitor.PulseAll(locker); // move any "waiting" threads to the "ready" queue
                    Monitor.Wait(locker); // relinquish the lock, and wait for a pulse
                    Console.WriteLine("The X thread");
                }
                Console.Write(i + ":X ");
            }
            Monitor.PulseAll(locker);
        }
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }

    static void WriteY()
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            for (; i < 100; i++)
            {
                if (i % 10 == 0)
                {
                    Monitor.PulseAll(locker); // move any "waiting" threads to the "ready" queue
                    Monitor.Wait(locker); // relinquish the lock, and wait for a pulse
                    Console.WriteLine("The Y thread");
                }
                Console.Write(i + ":Y ");
            }
            Monitor.PulseAll(locker); // move any "waiting" threads to the "ready" queue
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution work good! It provides a perfect alternation between X and Y. But it also prints a last line: 100X. But this is not supposed to happen. Why do you think it is happening? –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 9:33
    
I got it. Moved the Console.Write(i + ":X "); to the beginning of the for loop. –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 9:43

from my point of view, you're locking "locker" in current thread and want to yield the current task to an other thread... the lock is held by the first thread all the time -- it can't work?!

you have to manually lock the objects if you want to use multiple threads...

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question. I get the compile time error with or without lock. –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 8:26
    
so basically, if there is a lock, then, yield would not have any effect. Is that what you mean? –  TheSilverBullet Sep 14 '12 at 9:11
    
worse: yield wants to change the thread, but the lock is held on the other thread concurrently... –  TheHe Sep 14 '12 at 9:38

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