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Is there a nice way to read double from string with respect of overflowing, i.e. convert "1e500" -> +inf ?

The ways to read from string I am aware of:

  • ::std::stringstream - returns garbage on overflow;
  • ::boost::lexical_cast - thrown bad_lixecal_cast with no worthy information about the number being converted
  • ::std::strtod from cstdlib - afaik it is the only one that reports about overflows (by returning HUGE_VAL and setting errno to ERANGE), but using it is quiet inconvenient

Particularly I need a method to reliably convert string to number (double), e.g.

"1e100" -> 1e100
"1e300" -> 1e300
"1e309" -> +inf // handling overflow as ieee-754 'inf'

EDIT:

I'm actually using the last approach, here is code:

double stringToDouble(char const *str)
{
    double result = ::std::strtod(str, 0);

    if (ERANGE == errno)
    {
        if (HUGE_VAL == result)
        {
            result = INFINITY;
        }
        else if (-HUGE_VAL == result)
        {
            result = -INFINITY;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

I was rather surprised that stringstream doesn't handle overflow nicely. But it actually returns some other double value (unrelated to one being read), and reports only by stream::fail() means.

But still I'm looking for some C++-way number reading.

share|improve this question
2  
OK, use strtod, wrap the incovenience in a function, and the inconvenience is gone, no? –  john Sep 14 '12 at 8:57
    
are you sure there is no way to make istringstream report an error somehow for those numbers? What exactly is the garbage it returns? –  stijn Sep 14 '12 at 9:00
2  
@John: True, but how about providing a code sample? It might be obvious to you, but it's not obvious to the OP, or he wouldn't have asked. –  Robert Harvey Sep 14 '12 at 9:00
    
@RobertHarvey I'm not sure you're correct. But in any case I am only commenting, not providing an answer. If the OP requests some code, I'll gladly give it. –  john Sep 14 '12 at 9:02
    
@john I'm actually using this solution right now, but I was looking for some C++-way –  UncleAli Sep 14 '12 at 9:16
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1 Answer

Well, your current C way of doing things is a lot more efficient than what I'm about to suggest, but since you're asking for a C++ method, here is one by defining a manipulator-like object to protect you from overflows:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <limits>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

struct OverflowProtect
{
} limitdouble;

struct DoubleOverflowException : public std::exception
{

};

double stringToDouble(char const *str)
{
  double result = ::std::strtod(str, 0);

  if (ERANGE == errno)
  {
    if (HUGE_VAL == result)
    {
      throw DoubleOverflowException(); // throw whatever exception you want here
    }
    else if (-HUGE_VAL == result)
    {
      throw DoubleOverflowException(); // throw whatever exception you want here
    }
  }

  return result;
}

istream & operator >> (istream & aIn, const OverflowProtect & aManip)
{
  string number;
  aIn >> number;

  stringToDouble(number.c_str());

  for_each(number.rbegin(), number.rend(), [&aIn](char c){aIn.putback(c);});

  return aIn;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{  
  double nr;
  try
  {
    cin >> limitdouble >> nr;
  }
  catch ( DoubleOverflowException & e )
  {
    // handle overflow exception thrown by limitdouble
    e;
  }

  return 0;
}

Not the most efficient way, especially the operator>> implementation, but undoubtedly C++-like, and a lot of fun. I'm sure improvements can be made, I am just illustrating an idea.

share|improve this answer
    
well, it sure is a lot of fun. :) –  UncleAli Sep 14 '12 at 19:11
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