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Simplified classes are below. Every namespace is in seperate .cproj. I have "B is defined in an assembly that is not referenced" problem when building z.exe.

I added ctor A(string s) because I don't want to include y.dll in every z (I have a lot of z). How to make this work with no mess?

One way is to add another argument in A(B b) or A(string s) so that they have different number of arguments but this is not nice to me.

    //namespace x
    using y;
    public class A
    {
        public A(string s)
        public A(B b)
    }

    //namespace y
    public class B
    {
        public static explicit operator B(string s)
    }

    //namesapce z
    using x;
    public class C
    {
        void M()
        {
            string s = "";
            A(s);
        }
    }
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have you tried partial classes? –  elyashiv Sep 14 '12 at 9:11
    
@elyashiv Not sure how would partial class help. Can you please explain more about your idea? –  watbywbarif Sep 14 '12 at 9:36
    
declare A as partial, and declare A(B b) in y.dll. –  elyashiv Sep 14 '12 at 9:39
2  
@elyashiv, you can't split the implementation of a class across multiple assemblies using a partial class. Only across multiple source files that compile to the same assembly. –  Joe Sep 14 '12 at 10:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only way I know to achieve this is to make the second A constructor internal:

//namespace x     
public class A     
{         
    public A(string s)         
    internal A(B b)     
}

If you have other assemblies that need to use this constructor; you could consider using InternalsVisibleTo attribute.

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This is a nice trick, didn't know that this is possible. I'll just have to see how many friends I have and decide is this better or dummy parameter for those who are not my friends ;) –  watbywbarif Sep 14 '12 at 13:32
    
@watbywbarif, yes, it's probably best to limit it to a very few close friends :) If you have more than a few, you might want to reconsider your design - possibly move B into the same assembly as A. –  Joe Sep 14 '12 at 14:17

Why not derive another class from A which then hides the unwanted constructor?

public class ADerived : A
{
    public ADerived(string s) : base (s)
    {
    }
}

and then use ADerived from namespace / assembly z?

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This is one way for sure, but as I will have many A also this is unpractical. –  watbywbarif Sep 14 '12 at 9:40

Your class A references B (as a constructor parameter) so anything that use class A will also need to know class B to build.

By the way, for your code to build, there's a missing using y; before the A class declaration.

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Not true when constructors have different count of parameters. Tried that and no reference to B needed in z. Thanks for using y! –  watbywbarif Sep 14 '12 at 9:42
    
Right, it does build in this case~ –  Paciv Sep 14 '12 at 9:55
    
It would be so cool if it would also build with extra dummy argument which has default value, but that is not working ;( –  watbywbarif Sep 14 '12 at 13:34

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