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As I understand it, when you update one or more rows in SQL Server, the record is deleted and reinserted with the new values. Does this therefore mean that an INSERT event is triggered, or just an UPDATE when rows are updated?

EDIT: To highlight the main info for any lazy readers (although I recommend that you read the full link details in davek 's answer below):

Does SQL do all updates as split updates?

Short answer is:

NO

Slight longer answer:

For updates that change the key values, SQL will not do those as in-place updates.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that (the split into delete + insert) is only true when the update requires the index to be updated. See this link:

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/blogs/sqlinthewild/2011/06/21/are-all-updates-split-into-delete_2D00_insert_3F00_/

and particularly the last paragraph:

Now we do have a split update. We’ve got a delete_rows and an insert_rows operation in the log. This was not done as an in-place update So what can we conclude here? Does SQL do all updates as split updates? It should be clear that, for cases where the index key is not changed, SQL can do updates as in-place updates. I’m not going to try and claim that it always will, that would be silly, there are lots of scenarios that I haven’t looked at (page splits and forwarded rows being among the most obvious), but it can and will do in-place updates. For updates that change the key values, SQL will not do those as in-place updates. Paul explained that in one of his debunking posts a while back – http://sqlskills.com/BLOGS/PAUL/post/Do-changes-to-index-keys-really-do-in-place-updates.aspx

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That's great, thanks. – aSystemOverload Sep 14 '12 at 9:41
    
SQL Server will sometimes manage to still do in-place updates even if logically the key column is changed by transforming the operations such that the key column is unchanged and the non key columns get updated instead. – Martin Smith Dec 29 '12 at 14:04

An update never triggers an insert event even if physically it is implemented as an insert/delete as logically the operation is still an UPDATE.

There is a phrase in the accepted answer that is not quite true if taken to be talking about logical updates of the key column.

For updates that change the key values, SQL will not do those as in-place updates

This is not the case for a multirow update against a unique index. For those SQL Server gives a plan with split/sort/collapse operators. So in the following example the 9 update operations get converted to 1 delete, 8 updates, and an insert.

CREATE TABLE TestingUpdate7 (
ID INT,
SomeString CHAR(50)
)

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX idx_ID ON TestingUpdate7 (ID)

INSERT INTO TestingUpdate7 (ID, SomeString)
VALUES
(1,'One'),(2,'Two'),(3,'Three'),(4,'Four'),
(5,'Five'),(6,'Six'),(7,'Seven'),(8,'Eight'),(9,'Nine')

CHECKPOINT -- truncate the log, DB is in simple recovery.

UPDATE TestingUpdate7
SET  ID +=1

SELECT Operation, Context, AllocUnitName 
FROM fn_dblog(NULL, NULL) 

Returns

+-----------------+--------------------+---------------------------+
|    Operation    |      Context       |       AllocUnitName       |
+-----------------+--------------------+---------------------------+
| LOP_BEGIN_CKPT  | LCX_NULL           | NULL                      |
| LOP_XACT_CKPT   | LCX_BOOT_PAGE_CKPT | NULL                      |
| LOP_END_CKPT    | LCX_NULL           | NULL                      |
| LOP_BEGIN_XACT  | LCX_NULL           | NULL                      |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_SET_BITS    | LCX_PFS            | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW  | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS | LCX_CLUSTERED      | dbo.TestingUpdate7.idx_ID |
| LOP_COMMIT_XACT | LCX_NULL           | NULL                      |
+-----------------+--------------------+---------------------------+
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