Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have run into a situation in which I would like to store an in-memory cache of spatial data which is not immediately needed, and is not loaded from disk, but generated algorithmically. Because the data is accessed spatially, data would be deleted from the cache based on irrelevance factors and the distance from the location of the most recent read operation. The problem is that Java's garbage collection does not seem to integrate well with this system. I would like to use the spatial knowledge of the data to enable it to be garbage-collected by the JVM. Is there a way to mark these cache objects as garbage-collectible? If the JVM encounters an out-of-memory exception, is there a way to catch that exception and delete the cache objects to free up memory?

Or is this the wrong way to do things?

share|improve this question
    
Aren't you keeping the references in static fields? Btw. Guava has more a powerful cache type than HashMap. –  zeller Sep 14 '12 at 9:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there a way to mark these cache objects as garbage-collectible?

The simplest way is to store

  • some data with strong references e.g. in a LinkedHashMap, possible as a LRU cache.
  • data which you would like to retain if possible in a SoftReferences cache. These will not be cleaned up immediately but will be cleaned up before an OOME.
  • data which can be discarded with little cost in a WeakHashMap. This data is available until the GC is performed.

If the JVM encounters an out-of-memory exception, is there a way to catch that exception and delete the cache objects to free up memory?

You can do this but its not ideal as the error can be thrown anywhere in just about any thread.

share|improve this answer
    
I was just typing the same answer, take a look at the Access-Order Oriented example here and consider overriding removeEldestEntry() to delete the unsed items –  GrahamA Sep 14 '12 at 10:14
    
I have heard that the GC is run just before the out-of-memory exception occurs, so the WeakHashMap seems like it would work here. –  okw Sep 14 '12 at 19:17
    
Thanks for pointing me toward java.lang.ref –  okw Sep 14 '12 at 19:22
    
In case anyone else runs into this problem: WeakHashMap seems ill-suited for plain old caching, but works well in my case because the act of reloading data never touches the disk. –  okw Sep 14 '12 at 19:40
    
An alternative to using a WeakHashMap is to use a WeakReference to a HashMap. The reasoning is that all the keys of a WeakHashMap tend to be cleared at once (unless they are held elsewhere) which gives the JVM lots of WeakReferences to clean up. If you have just one reference even the HashMap starts a fresh after a cleanup. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 14 '12 at 19:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.