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i need to write regexp which match to strings:

  • lorem,ipsum,45,56
  • lorem123,ipsum56743,dolor34,78,86
  • lorem-123,ipsum5678,dolor654,12,45,90
  • 1230-lorem,234-ips546um-234,12,56,78

but doesn't match to strings:

  • 123-456-ABC20089
  • 12-4-ABC123456

My regexp doesn't work, because it match to last strings:

([a-z0-9,\-]*)

How can I exclude that?

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closed as not a real question by Barmar, pad, Ja͢ck, Jeremy J Starcher, arx Sep 27 '12 at 15:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I don't get the criteria for matching and not matching. Is comma mandatory for matching? –  Toto Sep 14 '12 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the following as your regex (which matches the offending strings):

\d+\-\d+\-[a-zA-Z0-9]+

Then in your PHP code you want to check for the opposite of the match:

<?php
$subject = "123-456-ABC20089";
$pattern = '/\d+\-\d+\-[a-zA-Z0-9]+/';
if(!preg_match($pattern, $subject)
{
    // it doesn't match
}
else
{
    // it does match, move along
}
?>
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with ^, which is the negate operator for reg exes. But here you just want to negate ","

(^[,]*)
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([a-z0-9\-]+,)+[a-z0-9\-]+

Matches two or more "words", separated by commas. Is that what you're looking for?

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